Welcome to Western Rehab

The sixty mile ride in the ambulance seemed so strange and unlike the ride I had the day of the accident. I was grateful to be in the passenger seat and not on the stretcher in the back. Both technicians were very friendly and asked lots of questions about the accident and our experience over the past seven weeks. It felt unreal as I talked to them about it. How could all of this have happened to me? Events like this happen to someone else, not me, somebody who is better prepared for it. When would I wake up from this bad dream? A sense of being stuck in it hit me hard.

Picture from http://www.healthsouthutah.com.       Formerly Western Rehab Hospital

Before I knew it we were pulling up to the entrance of Western Rehab. My excitement to finally be there turned to fear, like the first day of elementary school. You can hardly wait to go, but when you get there you realize you don’t know what it’s going to be like. My eagerness turned to worry as the EMT’s unstrapped the stretcher from the ambulance and wheeled it into the hospital. I hadn’t given much thought about what would be expected or how hard and painful it would be until we walked through the doors. Yes, I had taken a tour of the hospital and had met some of the staff before, but all that was discussed on that visit was the details of the facility and their therapy program. My confidence turned to insecurity as we approached the front desk to check in with Mark lying on the stretcher in a coma.

Picture from http://www.healthsouthutah.com. Formerly Western Rehab Hospital

The receptionist welcomed us and said Mark’s room was going to be in the special care unit right in front of the nurse’s station.  She directed us to go straight down the hallway. One EMT pushed the stretcher from the head of the bed while the other guided from the foot. My mother had followed the ambulance in her car and met up with us at the receptionist desk. As we walked by Mark’s side, I noticed a man in a wheelchair with his head bolted to a halo. The sparkling clean, wide tile hallway seemed filled with pain and suffering. I was overwhelmed by what some of the patients were enduring. Sights of treatments for injuries I had never seen before. Would I get used to seeing discomfort, agony and grief? Mark was in a peaceful coma; what would his recovery be like? Am I strong enough to handle it?

As we approached the nurse’s station we were greeted by Rita, a cheerful, friendly nurse who escorted us to Mark’s room. While the EMT’s were getting Mark transferred from the stretcher to the hospital bed, Rita opened the closet door and said, “Bring some clothes for Mark because we plan to dress him every day. He will need loose fitting pull over shirts and pull on pants with high top shoes. Socks and underwear can go in these drawers, along with any other personal belongings you want to bring,” she said as she pulled out one of the drawers on the left side of the closet.  She pointed to the white board on the right side of the closet. “This will be Mark’s daily schedule.” Written on the board was:

Therapy

9:00 am OT – Cheryl

10:00 am Respiratory

11:00 am PT – Leslie

Noon – 1pm – Rest

1:30 pm  Speech – Chris

2:00 pm OT – Cheryl

3:00 pm PT – Leslie

4:00 pm  Respiratory

4:30 pm Speech – Chris

10:00pm Respiratory

Sitting Up

Up – 11:00 am                   Down – 12:00 pm

Up – 2:00 pm                     Down – 4:00 pm

Up – 8:00 pm                     Down – 9:30 pm

Wow, what a busy schedule. How can Mark do all that? At McKay-Dee Hospital Mark didn’t have a set schedule, so I was thrilled they thought he could do it, yet flabbergasted at what seemed unrealistic.  In my mind I could see the doctor at Mackay-Dee Hospital, saying “I tried to tell you it’s too soon.” I pushed the thought out of my head as I remembered my first day of school and the overwhelming feelings of schedules and expectations. However, from the past I’d learned I could adapt, so I silently committed to help Mark in every way adjust to this new schedule and meet their expectations.

I was familiar with the range of motion routine the Physical Therapist (PT) would do with Mark at McKay-Dee Hospital, but I couldn’t imagine why he needed a Speech Therapist (ST) or an Occupational Therapist (OT).

“What will Mark do in speech therapy while he’s in a coma and has a trachea tube?” I asked the nurse as she detached the tube from the portable ventilator to the stationary hospital ventilator and hung his IV to the post on his bed.

“The therapist will come by and explain what they will do in their therapy sessions and the doctor should be in any minute now. Make yourself at home and let me know if I can get you anything.”

I sat in the chair next to Mark’s bed and Mom took one on the other side. I looked at Mark and was relieved that the move appeared to go unnoticed by him. He slept peacefully through the ambulance ride and transferring from the stretcher to the bed. He seemed unaware of his new surroundings. I was grateful to be in our home town of Sandy, UT.

A young, handsome man walked into our room and introduced himself as Mark’s new neurologist, Dr. Wright. He reviewed the reports he’d read  from McKay-Dee Hospital with us and we discussed the  treatment plan. His mannerism was gentle and compassionate. Immediately I felt at ease with him and confident Mark’s recovery was in good hands. He explained Mark would be completing the powerful intravenous anti-biotic in five days and he ordered all therapies to be done in his room until then.

“What will they be doing in respiratory therapy?” I asked, pointing to the schedule.

“The therapist will keep the tracheotomy cleaned and gradually turn down the ventilator, weaning him off of it. The respiratory therapist will help Mark learn to breathe on his own again.”

“What about speech therapy?” I asked.

“They use objects like bells and whistles to try to get Mark to respond to them.”

“Cool,” I said, hopeful and excited. This staff is planning for him to come out of his coma!

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4 thoughts on “Welcome to Western Rehab

  1. Being closer to home would have felt better to me as well and considering the condition that Mark was in, I would have felt better with the progressive therapies. Forge ahead! Let’s get this thing going! You remind me a lot of myself . . .

  2. This story brings me to tears. When I look at Mark, and I read of your travails with him, I marvel that, along with skills, like speech, that he did retain, he also was blessed to have his wry, comical personality left intact. What a miracle. Not to mention, he’s still a handsome guy!

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