The Wonders of Recovery

Mark’s left hip replacement went well last Tuesday, January 26th, despite the delay. It didn’t even get started until 5:30 PM due to difficulties with a prior surgery. Around 9:30 PM he was moved into a hospital room groggy, but awake. It made for a very long day and night. His appetite and strength have been very good. The main concern has been the dark, huge bruise from under his armpit to his waistline, not where we expected to see bruising after hip surgery, which makes me wonder what went on in that surgical room.

Wednesday, Mark had a radiation treatment to slow the bone growth in his hips, which is the cause of his joint problems. Thursday, he was released from the hospital to Rocky Mountain Care.

If you’ve experienced rehabilitation, you’re probably familiar with uncertainties like: How long will it take to recover? When will we realize the advantage of surgery? How much pain will have to be endured? These and possibly many more questions, along with the enormous desire to feel better right now are part of the recovering process.

Before Mark was discharged from the hospital with the right hip surgery last July, I visited six rehab centers in our area which were listed with the insurance company. I can’t imagine spending such an important and limited time in a facility without doing research first. With the doctors recommendation, we’d wanted Mark could go to HealthSouth for rehabilitation. They specialize in neurological problems and since Mark has a traumatic brain injury (TBI), I knew they had equipment which Mark would need for rehab. However, the insurance wouldn’t allow it because this rehab was based on a hip surgery and not TBI. Disappointed, yet determined to get Mark the best possible help with therapy, our second choice was Rocky Mountain Care. I was impressed with their homelike atmosphere, clean smell and they had more equipment than the other gyms I visited on the insurance approved list.

Mark’s TBI and physical limitations give him special needs. At home we have a standing frame and a roll-in shower along with a shower/commode chair which he uses daily. The rehab centers on our insurance list didn’t have either and since they’re important for his recovery, therapy plan and general health, I’m willing to bring them from home along with his custom walker. The challenge is finding a room which has space for it all, plus an extended bed for his height and a trapeze, which helps him change position while he’s in bed. Along with these essentials he needs the capability to maneuver his wheelchair in and out of the room. Wow, this list sounds pretty lengthy and must be why we don’t travel anymore.

Suite office & kitchen

Suite kitchen and my office area. Door in between goes to bedroom.

Suite living room

Suite living room

Fortunately, Rocky Mountain Care has a couple of rooms which can accommodate Mark’s needs and they’re willing to let us arrange the room to do so. In August and September of 2015, we were lucky enough to get a suite. It was beautifully furnished and definitely the nicest room in the building. The kitchen had a full-size fridge , small microwave and a solid wood dining table with six cushion chairs.

Suite living room (2)

Suite living room with therapy balloons and balls.

Suite bathroom

Suite bathroom

The living room was furnished with a couch, two comfortable stuffed chairs separated by a table and lamp and a television on top of a beautiful wood stand. A large wood desk was in the back of this room by a glass sliding door which led out to a small patio. The view of the mountains from the living room and patio was spectacular.

The separate bedroom had two twin sized beds, a large dresser, a chest of drawers and a roomy closet. The bathroom had ceramic tiles with a roll-in shower and was perfect for the shower/commode chair or wheelchair. This is unlike any other room Mark’s ever had in a rehab center. We felt spoiled and a little guilty for having it.

Rehab1

Therapists, Brandi and Trish

The room was wonderful, but the biggest advantage to Rocky Mountain was the therapists. They were knowledgeable, caring and worked hard to improved Mark’s abilities. For this reason, they were our first choice this time around. It was nice to have the decision made before surgery and it actually decreased a day in the hospital because we made the arrangements beforehand.

Since Mark has a severe short-term memory problem, he is dependent on me to keep him oriented. Unfamiliar surroundings and routine make him feel unsettled and his memory is worse. He forgets what he’s supposed to be doing and where he is, which can make him agitated or anxious. Since I want him to get the full advantage and have the best experience with rehab, I prefer to stay with him. The suite made it easier, but because it’s a lot more costly than a regular room, we are not in the suite for this round of rehab. It’s been an adjustment and the difference is like being on a cruise verses camping complete with an air-mattress for me. It’s hard for me to go home because I worry he might have a seizure and the nursing or aide staff will not know. I wonder if he’ll be able to find or remember how to use the call button when he needs help and the waiting time for that help also concerns me.

Mark's bed on the west wall.

Mark’s bed on the west wall.

IMG_1025

Entrance to room

I like to be involved in Mark’s care—not to interfere, but rather assist while he is here. However, it’s awkward to step back since I’ve been taking care of him for so many years. I have to continually remind myself  that what seems so obvious or natural to me isn’t for the professional caregiver who has several patients at one time with all different levels of abilities. I’m realizing every rehab experience is different even with the same patient, therapists and caregiver staff.  But the goal is always the same—to get home stronger and better. We’re confident it will happen with the therapy and supported care we have here.

Mark's standing frame and my work station.

Mark’s standing frame and my work station. West and south wall.

IMG_1030

East wall with my air-mattress standing up, which I lay down for sleeping.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We are grateful for all the well wishes and prayers. We feel blessed and amazed at Mark’s ability to heal and adapt to foreign implant objects. This along with all the love and care of others is the most wonderful part of recovery.

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