September 2017 Newsletter

Welcome.OctThe effects of brain injury can be complicated and may cause feelings of isolation. Associating with others in similar circumstances can be refreshing. For this reason I’ve gathered information on this month’s support groups and therapy services offered in the Salt Lake Valley. I also included notes from last months meeting’s in case you missed it. Please check out the upcoming events and mark your calendar for the BIAU Annual Conference. Also included are links to useful websites. If you have an activity, announcements or other information you’d like to share in this newsletter, please email Barbara@UnitingCaregivers.com.


Mark your Calendar

Leaves1

FREE SUPPORT GROUPS AVAILABLE IN THE SALT LAKE VALLEY

September 5, 2017 – Aphasia Support Group at 7:00 p.m. Meets the 1st Tuesday monthly at Brookdale, 76 South 500 East, SLC, UT. (Parking in the rear of the building.  Enter from 100 South.) For more information, please contact Christina Nessler (801) 582-1565, Extension 5379 or Kiera Berggren (801) 585-9717.

September 12, 2017– Brain Injury Alliance Support Group for Adults, 6-8 p.m. Meets every 2nd Tuesday monthly at Sanderson Community Deaf Center, 5709 South 1500 West, SLC, UT 84123. This is a social group where dinner is enjoyed together and then games played or crafts made. All caregivers and survivors are welcome this month for rotisserie chicken and potatoes. Bring a side dish or dessert to share if you’d like. For more information call: Jennifer (801) 386-2195 or Beth (801) 585-5511.

September 21, 2017 –  Caregivers and Survivors Education Group Meets every 3rd Thursday monthly at Intermountain Medical Center (IMC) 5171 S., Cottonwood St., Bldg. 1 Murray, UT 84107.

Good Nights SleepCaregivers meet in the conference room on the 7th Floor.  This month’s topic: Strategies for Facilitating a Good Night’s Sleep. Presented by Neuropsychologist, Jon L. Pertab, PhD.

Journey to LiveSurvivors Meet in the conference room on the 9thFloor.  This month’s topic: Journey to Live. Presented by Trisha Beck

September 26, 2017 – University of Utah Brain Injury Support Group 7 p.m. Meets every 4th Tuesday monthly at Sugarhouse Health Center, 1138 E. Wilmington Avenue, SLC, UT 84106. Call Ryan Pello for questions at (801) 581-2221


LeavesFREE WEEKLY GROUPS

INTERMOUNTAIN HEALTH CARE NEURO THERAPY SERVICES

Aphasia Talking Practice Group – Meets every Tuesday Noon-1 p.m. 5770 South 250 East #G50

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­Meditation Group – Meets every Wednesday 3 p.m. 5770 South 250 East Cafeteria Conference Room

Cognitive Skills Group – Meets every Thursday Noon-1 p.m. 5770 South 250 East #G50

Contact: Dr. Russo at antonietta.russo@imail.org


september-month-autumn

Epilepsy Groups for those affected by seizures.

Together we share coping strategies, provide encouragement, comfort and advice from people with common experiences. For more information contact Margo at (801)455-6089 or Utah@efa.org

September 7, 2017 – Epilepsy Group for Parents 7:00 p.m.-8:15 p.m. Meets every 1st Thursday of the month Riverton Library Auditorium 12877 S. 1830 W., Riverton, UT.

September 14, 2017 – Epilepsy Group for All Effected by Seizures 7:00 – 8:30 p.m. Meets every 2nd Thursday of the month Intermountain Medical Center (IMC) 5171 S. Cottonwood St., Bldg. 1, Ninth Floor, Murray, UT.

EpilepsySeptember 20, 2017 – Epilepsy Group for All Effected by Seizures 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Meets every 3rd Wednesday of the month SLC Main Library 200 E. 400 S., SLC, UT (2nd floor conference room).

September 27, 2017 – Epilepsy Group for Teens 7 p.m. Will meet the 4th Wednesday monthly at the West Jordan Library, 8030 So. 1825 W., West Jordan, UT. There will be two teachers overseeing this group. Come to enjoy an activity and meet other teens with epilepsy.

September 28, 2017 – Epilepsy Group for Women Only 7:00 – 8:15 p.m. Meets every 4th Thursday of the month SLC Main Library 200 E. 400 S. (3rd floor conference room)


Missed It Header
THE BRAIN INJURY ALLIANCE SUPPORT GROUP for ADULTS MEETING NOTES

Deaf CenterSanderson Community Deaf Center located 5709 South 1500 West, Murray, UT 84107

Tuesday, August 8, 2017, we had a great time    playing cards and eat     Thank you Jennifer Gee and Beth Cardell for doing a great job directing this group. For more information call Jennifer (801) 468-0027 or Beth (801) 585-5511.


InCaseYouMissedItIntermountain Medical Center 5171 S, Cottonwood St., Bldg. 1, Murray, UT  84107

SURVIVORS AND CAREGIVERS EDUCATION MEETINGS were held on August 17, 2017.

Caregivers met in the conference room on the 7th Floor for a great presentation on Mind, Body and Spirit. Dr. Kimberly O. Sieber, Psychologist phD gave us five simple ways to increase physical and emotional well-being. She gave us strategies known for their medical and psychological health benefits that can easily be incorporated into the busy life of a caregiver. For details see Five Ways to Increase Your Well-being.

 

Survivors met in the conference room on the 9th Floor for an informative presentation on Vision After Brain Injury or Stroke.

 

missed it_9University of Utah Brain Injury Support Group located at Sugarhouse Health Center 1138 E. Wilmington Avenue, SLC, UT 84106. Last month they had a summer picnic at Sugar House Park on Tuesday, August 22, 2017. Sandwiches were provided while those in attendance brought food items to share.

 


Coming Soon

 

SEIZE THE NIGHT – UTAH 5K  RUN/WALK

“Come lace up your shoes, crack open your glow sticks and get ready for an electrifying 5K Run/Walk! It will be a unique and enlightening night time event, aimed at raising epilepsy awareness in Utah. Be ready to light up the dance floor as you cross the finish line.”

Date: September 16, 2017

Time: 6pm

Place: Sugar House Park, Big Field Pavilion

Registration: $25.00

Register yourself or your team today! Raise money and awareness to help people in Utah living with epilespy. Register at www.epilepsy.com/utah


Upcoming EventsBIAU FAMILY & PROFESSIONALS ANNUAL CONFERENCE

Building Connections for a Brighter Tomorrow.

Date: Friday, October 13, 2017

Time: 8am – 5pm

Place: Davis Conference Center, 1651 No. 700 W. Layton, UT 84041

Registration: $40 for members/ $50 for non members and includes lunch. Scholarships available. 

See https://biau.org/events/ for conference details and registration information.  “Attendees will learn how individuals with brain injury build connections. Topics will include: Social Skills, Rehabilitation Process, Cognitive Strategies, Technology/App use, Caregiver/Survivor Lessons, ADA, Social Security & Patient Rights, Classroom Executive Functioning, Concussion and Return to Activity/School”


dont-forget-smileyUTAH GRIZZLIES EPILEPSY AWARENESS HOCKEY GAME

Date: October 21, 2017

Time: 7 pm

Place: Maverik Center – West Valley City 

Tickets: $10 – $20

You can get your tickets at www.epilepsy.com/utah . “The attendees will be receiving epilepsy information throughout the evening, and the team will be wearing and auctioning the jerseys specially made for this game. Mark your calendar and bring your friends.”


Bright Ideas

 

                              HELPFUL WEBSITES:

http://www.caregiver.org (online webinars for caregivers)

http://www.tbicommunity.org (online educational programs)

http://www.braininjury.com (medical, legal, information resource)

http://www.abta.org (brain tumor education and information)

http://www.cdc.gov/ncipc/tbi (brain injury facts, programs, education)

http://www.ninds.nih.gov/Disorders/all-disorders (education for brain injury, stroke and other neurological disorders)

http://www.msktc.org/tbi (TBI Model Systems Knowledge Translation Center) national leaders in TBI research and patient care.

http://www.epilepsy.com/utah and/or http://www.epilepsy.com (seizure education and support by state or national)

https://biau.org (resource for those with brain injury)

http://www.brainline.org (preventing, treating and living with TBI)

Uniquely abledACTIVITIES TO DO WEBSITES:

https://store.usgs.gov/access-pass (free pass to National Parks & Federal Land Agency areas)

https://wildlife.utah.gov/watchable-wildlife-for-disabled.html (watchable wildlife for disabled persons)

http://slco.org/adaptive/plus-one-pass (Salt Lake County Disability Plus One Pass)

https://twilightinsight.wordpress.com/hobbies/hobbies-for-healing-the-brain/tbi-and-selecting-a-hobby (select a hobby – ideas especially for TBI survivors)

http://www.discovernac.org (National Ability Center)

http://wanderookie.com/blog/2015/07/27/12-beautiful-wheelchair-accessible-trails-in-utah
(wheelchair accessible trails in Utah)

https://www.visitutah.com/Media/Default/One%20Sheeters/Accessible_Utah_web.pdf (list of accessible resources)

wasatchadaptivesports.org (Wasatch Adaptive Sports)

http://www.discovernac.org (National Ability Center)

https://www.meetup.com (meet up groups)

Laptops

SHARING WEBSITES:

Laptops http://www.brainline.org/abbymaslin (blog about loving and learning after TBI)

http://www.unitingcaregivers.wordpress.com (caregivers sharing stories, tips and thoughts)

http://www.facebook.com/UTteensupportgroup (social interaction and the exchange useful resources)


newsletter

Thank you for reading. I hope you found the information helpful and will follow this website via email to receive notifications of every new post. The “Follow” button is located at the beginning of the newsletter. However, if you want to subscribe only to a monthly newsletter, please email Barbara@UnitingCaregivers.com. I will add you to the newsletter email list and send you the link monthly.

If you wish to discontinue send a statement, “Unsubscribe to Newsletter” and I will remove your email address.

 

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August 2017 Newsletter

August1

The effects of brain injury can be complicated and may cause feelings of isolation. Associating with others in similar circumstances can be refreshing. For this reason I’ve gathered information on this month’s support groups and therapy services offered in the Salt Lake Valley. I also included notes from last month’s meetings in case you missed it. Please check out the upcoming events and mark your calendar for the BIAU Annual Conference. Also included are links to useful websites. If you have an activity, announcements or other information you’d like to share in this newsletter, please email Barbara@UnitingCaregivers.com.


reminder

FREE SUPPORT GROUPS AVAILABLE IN THE SALT LAKE VALLEY

August 8, 2017– Brain Injury Alliance Support Group for Adults, 6-8 p.m. Meets every 2nd Tuesday monthly at Sanderson Community Deaf Center, 5709 South 1500 West, SLC, UT 84123. This social group will enjoy pizza and root beer floats followed by card games this month. All caregivers and survivors are welcome. For more information call: Jennifer (801) 386-2195 or Beth (801) 585-5511.

August 17, 2017 – Intermountain Healthcare Brain Injury and Stroke Education Group, 7-8 p.m. Meets every 3rd Thursday monthly at Intermountain Medical Center (IMC) 5171 S., Cottonwood St., Bldg. 1 Murray, UT 84107.

Caregivers meet in the conference room on the 7thFloor.  August Caregiver Support

This months topic: Mind, Body and Spirit. Five Simple ways to increase physical and emotional well-being by Dr. Kimberly O. Sieber, Psychologist phD. We’ll be discussing a variety of strategies known for their medical and psychological health benefits and can easily be incorporated into the busy life of a caregiver.

August Survivor SG

 

Survivors meet in the conference room on the 9thFloor.

Topic: Vision After Brain Injury or Stroke.

 

fun in sun

 

August 22, 2017 – University of Utah Brain Injury Support Group 7 p.m. Meets every 4th Tuesday monthly at Sugarhouse Health Center, 1138 E. Wilmington Avenue, SLC, UT 84106. Call Ryan Pello for questions at (801) 581-2221


Please Note
FREE WEEKLY GROUPS

offered through INTERMOUNTAIN HEALTH CARE NEURO THERAPY SERVICES:

Aphasia Talking Practice Group – Meets every Tuesday Noon-1 p.m. 5770 South 250 East #G50

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­Meditation Group – Meets every Wednesday 3 p.m. 5770 South 250 East Cafeteria Conference Room

Cognitive Skills Group – Meets every Thursday Noon-1 p.m. 5770 South 250 East #G50

Contact: Dr. Russo at antonietta.russo@imail.org


Epilepsy

Epilepsy Groups for those affected by seizures.

Together we share coping strategies, provide encouragement, comfort and advice from people with common experiences. For more information contact Margo at (801)455-6089 or Utah@efa.org

August 3, 2017 – Epilepsy Group for Parents 7:00 p.m.-8:15 p.m. Meets every 1st Thursday of the month Riverton Library Auditorium 12877 S. 1830 W., Riverton, UT.

August 10, 2017 – Epilepsy Group for All Effected by Seizures 7:00 – 8:30 p.m. Meets every 2nd Thursday of the month Intermountain Medical Center (IMC) 5171 S. Cottonwood St., Bldg. 1, Ninth Floor, Murray, UT.

August 16, 2017 – Epilepsy Group for All Effected by Seizures 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Meets every 3rd Wednesday of the month SLC Main Library 200 E. 400 S., SLC, UT (2nd floor conference room).

August 24, 2017 – Epilepsy Group for Teens 7 p.m. Will meet the 4th Thursday monthly at the West Jordan Library, 8030 So. 1825 W., West Jordan, UT. There will be two teachers overseeing this group. Come to enjoy an activity and meet other teens with epilepsy.

August 24, 2017 – Epilepsy Group for Women Only 7:00 – 8:15 p.m. Meets every 4th Thursday of the month SLC Main Library 200 E. 400 S. (3rd floor conference room)


Missed8

THE BRAIN INJURY ALLIANCE SUPPORT GROUP for ADULTS MEETING NOTES

Deaf CenterSanderson Community Deaf Center located 5709 South 1500 West, Murray, UT 84107

Tuesday, July 11, 2017, a good time was had by those in attendance. Dinner was provided while others brought treats and drinks to share. Summer olympic games followed dinner. Thank you Jennifer Gee and Beth Cardell for doing a great job directing this group. For more information call Jennifer (801) 468-0027 or Beth (801) 585-5511.


 

WAS_40yrs_websiteSURVIVORS AND CAREGIVERS EDUCATION MEETING NOTES

Intermountain Medical Center 5171 S, Cottonwood St., Bldg. 1, Murray, UT  84107

Jake at Wasatch Adaptive Sports hosted our annual survivor’s and caregiver’s summer picnic, so this month we met at Snowbird Ski and Summer Resort. We enjoyed a wonderful evening in the cooler temperatures of the beautiful mountains of Little Cottonwood Canyon on Thursday, July 20, 2017. All in attendance were refreshed by the smell of pine trees and clean mountain air. We ate sandwiches and a variety of side dishes, which were brought by those in attendance. A wheelchair accessible walk and/or ride in a tram up to the top of the mountain was available for those interested. Some chose to stay and visit in the picnic area. Thanks Wasatch Adaptive Sports for a wonderful evening!

Check out their website for programs, http://wasatchadaptivesports.org

“Why Adaptive Recreation? Regular physical activity is essential for the maintenance of normal muscle strength, flexibility, and joint structure and function and may slow the functional decline often associated with disabling conditions. Adequate levels of muscular strength and endurance are associated with increased bone mass, reduction in injury from falls, and an increased ability to complete daily activities. The primary goals for increasing physical activity in individuals with disabilities are to reverse secondary effects of impaired mobility, optimize physical functioning, and enhance overall well-being.”


coming-soonUTAH PURPLE TALENT SHOW

Date: August 12, 2017

Time: Noon – 2pm

Place: Salt Lake Acting Company

Tickets: $3.00

Proceeds benefit the Epilepsy Foundation of Utah.

 

SEIZE THE NIGHT – UTAH 5K  RUN/WALK

“Come lace up your shoes, crack open your glow sticks and get ready for an electrifying 5K Run/Walk! It will be a unique and enlightening night time event, aimed at raising epilepsy awareness in Utah. Be ready to light up the dance floor as you cross the finish line.”

Date: September 16, 2017

Time: 6pm

Place: Sugar House Park, Big Field Pavilion

Registration: $25.00

Register yourself or your team today! Raise money and awareness to help people in Utah living with epilespy. Register at www.epilepsy.com/utah

 

dont-forget-smileyBIAU

 FAMILY & PROFESSIONALS ANNUAL CONFERENCE

Building Connections for a Brighter Tomorrow.

Date: Friday, October 13, 2017

Time: 8am – 5pm

Place: Davis Conference Center, 1651 No. 700 W. Layton, UT 84041

Registration: $40 for members/ $50 for non members and includes lunch. Scholarships available. 

See https://biau.org/events/ for conference details and registration information.  “Attendees will learn how individuals with brain injury build connections. Topics will include: Social Skills, Rehabilitation Process, Cognitive Strategies, Technology/App use, Caregiver/Survivor Lessons, ADA, Social Security & Patient Rights, Classroom Executive Functioning, Concussion and Return to Activity/School”

 

UTAH GRIZZLIES EPILEPSY AWARENESS HOCKEY GAME

 

Date: October 21, 2017

Time: 7 pm

Place: Maverik Center – West Valley City 

Tickets: $10 – $20

You can get your tickets at www.epilepsy.com/utah . “The attendees will be receiving epilepsy information throughout the evening, and the team will be wearing and auctioning the jerseys specially made for this game. Mark your calendar and bring your friends.”

 


Bright Ideas

                              HELPFUL WEBSITES:

http://www.caregiver.org (online webinars for caregivers)

http://www.tbicommunity.org (online educational programs)

http://www.braininjury.com (medical, legal, information resource)

http://www.abta.org (brain tumor education and information)

http://www.cdc.gov/ncipc/tbi (brain injury facts, programs, education)

http://www.ninds.nih.gov/Disorders/all-disorders (education for brain injury, stroke and other neurological disorders)

http://www.msktc.org/tbi (TBI Model Systems Knowledge Translation Center) national leaders in TBI research and patient care.

http://www.epilepsy.com/utah and/or http://www.epilepsy.com (seizure education and support by state or national)

https://biau.org (resource for those with brain injury)

http://www.brainline.org (preventing, treating and living with TBI)

Uniquely abledACTIVITIES TO DO WEBSITES:

https://store.usgs.gov/access-pass (free pass to National Parks & Federal Land Agency areas)

https://wildlife.utah.gov/watchable-wildlife-for-disabled.html (watchable wildlife for disabled persons)

http://slco.org/adaptive/plus-one-pass (Salt Lake County Disability Plus One Pass)

https://twilightinsight.wordpress.com/hobbies/hobbies-for-healing-the-brain/tbi-and-selecting-a-hobby (select a hobby – ideas especially for TBI survivors)

http://www.discovernac.org (National Ability Center)

http://wanderookie.com/blog/2015/07/27/12-beautiful-wheelchair-accessible-trails-in-utah
(wheelchair accessible trails in Utah)

https://www.visitutah.com/Media/Default/One%20Sheeters/Accessible_Utah_web.pdf (list of accessible resources)

wasatchadaptivesports.org (Wasatch Adaptive Sports)

http://www.discovernac.org (National Ability Center)

https://www.meetup.com (meet up groups)

Laptops

SHARING WEBSITES:

Laptops http://www.brainline.org/abbymaslin (blog about loving and learning after TBI)

http://www.unitingcaregivers.wordpress.com (caregivers sharing stories, tips and thoughts)

http://www.facebook.com/UTteensupportgroup (social interaction and the exchange useful resources)


 

Thank you for reading. I hope you found the information helpful and will follow this website via email to receive notifications of every new post. The “Follow” button is located at the beginning of the newsletter. However, if you want to subscribe only to a monthly newsletter, please email Barbara@UnitingCaregivers.com. I will add you to the newsletter email list and send you the link monthly.

If you wish to discontinue send a statement, “Unsubscribe to Newsletter” and I will remove your email address.

July 2017 Newsletter

July fireworksThe effects of brain injury vary and can be complex. Putting the puzzle together is easier with the help of others. For this reason I’ve gathered pieces of information on this month’s support groups and therapy services offered in the Salt Lake Valley. July starAlso included are notes from last months meeting’s in case you missed it and upcoming events to mark on your calendar. I have listed links to useful websites. If you have an activity, announcements or other information you’d like to share in this newsletter, please email Barbara@UnitingCaregivers.com.


reminder

FREE SUPPORT GROUPS AVAILABLE IN THE SALT LAKE VALLEY

July 11, 2017– Brain Injury Alliance Support Group for Adults, 6-8 p.m. Meets every 2nd Tuesday monthly at Sanderson Community Deaf Center, 5709 South 1500 West, SLC, UT 84123. This is a social group where dinner is enjoyed together and then games played or crafts made. All caregivers and survivors are welcome. For more information call: Jennifer (801) 386-2195 or Beth (801) 585-5511.

July 20, 2017 – Intermountain Healthcare Support Group meets every 3rd Thursday monthly usually at (IMC) 5171 S., Cottonwood St., Bldg. 1 Murray, UT 84107. This month the Caregivers and Survivors will combine for the annual summer picnic at 5:30-8 p.m. This year Wasatch Adaptive Sports is hosting at 9385 S. Snowbird Center Drive, Snowbird, UT 84092. There will be free tram rides and fishing! Intermountain will provide sandwiches, water, and paper goods. Please bring a side dish to share.

July ClipArt

July 27, 2017 – University of Utah Brain Injury Support Group 7 p.m. Meets every 4th Tuesday monthly at Sugarhouse Health Center, 1138 E. Wilmington Avenue, SLC, UT 84106. Call Ryan Pello for questions at (801) 581-2221


Please Note
FREE WEEKLY GROUPS

offered through

INTERMOUNTAIN HEALTH CARE NEURO THERAPY SERVICES

Aphasia Talking Practice Group – Meets every Tuesday Noon-1 p.m. 5770 South 250 East #G50

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­Meditation Group – Meets every Wednesday 3 p.m. 5770 South 250 East Cafeteria Conference Room

Cognitive Skills Group – Meets every Thursday Noon-1 p.m. 5770 South 250 East #G50

Contact: Dr. Russo at antonietta.russo@imail.org


Epilepsy

July heartEpilepsy Groups for those affected by seizures.

Together we share coping strategies, provide encouragement, comfort and advice from people with common experiences. For more information contact Margo at (801)455-6089 or Utah@efa.org

July 6, 2017 – Epilepsy Group for Parents 7:00 p.m.-8:15 p.m. Meets every 1st Thursday of the month Riverton Library Auditorium 12877 S. 1830 W., Riverton, UT.

July 13, 2017 – Epilepsy Group for All Effected by Seizures 7:00 – 8:30 p.m. Meets every 2nd Thursday of the month Intermountain Medical Center (IMC) 5171 S. Cottonwood St., Bldg. 1, Ninth Floor, Murray, UT.

July 19, 2017 – Epilepsy Group for All Effected by Seizures 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Meets every 3rd Wednesday of the month SLC Main Library 200 E. 400 S., SLC, UT (2nd floor conference room).

July balloons

July 26, 2017 – Epilepsy Group for Teens 7 p.m. Will meet the 4th Wednesday monthly at the West Jordan Library, 8030 So. 1825 W., West Jordan, UT. There will be two teachers overseeing this group. Come to enjoy an activity and meet other teens with epilepsy.

July 27, 2017 – Epilepsy Group for Women Only 7:00 – 8:15 p.m. Meets every 4th Thursday of the month SLC Main Library 200 E. 400 S. (3rd floor conference room)


Missed6

JUNE’S MEETING NOTES FOR:

THE BRAIN INJURY ALLIANCE SUPPORT GROUP for ADULTS, located at the Sanderson Community Deaf Center, 5709 South 1500 West, Murray, UT 84107. Met Tuesday, June 13, 2017, we had a luau. The Hawaiian feast was delicious as we enjoyed visiting about our individual summer plans. After dinner there were some activities available, while others choose to visit. Thank you Jennifer Gee and Beth Cardell for doing a great job directing this group. For more information call Jennifer (801) 468-0027 or Beth (801) 585-5511.



SURVIVORS AND CAREGIVERS EDUCATION, located at Intermountain Medical Center 5171 S, Cottonwood St., Bldg. 1, Murray, UT  84107.

Caregivers met in the conference room on the 7th Floor and received tips from Kerrie Neu on how to replenish, recharge and renew. She shared with us what has worked for her and other caregivers she interviewed. The presentation was helpful in igniting ideas to meet our personal needs. For more details, click on the green links.

fun in sun

Survivors met in the conference room on the 9th Floor. Thanks Greg Nordfelt for sharing your notes.

The topic was Fun in the Sun, presented by Wasatch Adaptive Sports. Jake Thelen, Program Specialist, introduced their programs and said they focus on increasing independence and mobility in a social environment. They believe in the development of ability and active living through recreation for individuals with adaptive needs and their families. Through personalized assessments and instruction, along with adaptive equipment, they work together to achieve your goals and experience the outdoors without limitations.

Wasatch has three rehab physicians, three physical therapists and up to 30 event employees and therapists to assist in events as needed.  Jake said they keep participant to therapist levels as close to one to one as possible so that survivors are protected and have an absolutely wonderful experience with their activities.

Jake said they have never had a participant not be able to perform the activity they’ve been approved to participate in! Wasatch Adaptive Sports serves approximately 800 to 1,000 survivors per year.

Wasatch have a special relationship with Snowbird and their headquarters is located at 9385 S Snowbird Center Dr, Snowbird, Utah 84092. They have access to a fishing pond at Snowbird that is one of their most popular sites. They also provide activities during each week at Jordan River Parkway, Provo, Liberty Park and Sugarhouse Park.

Jake agreed to host our combined TBI Survivor & Caregiver Support Group annual summer picnic in July and have an activity at the headquarters at Snowbird Utah (instead of a local park in Salt Lake where or annual summer picnics are usually held). This was a very gracious offer and we were all very excited to change venues this year!

For more information see Wasatch website: wasatchadaptivesports.org


University of Utah Brain Injury Support Group, located at Sugarhouse Health Center 1138 E. Wilmington Avenue, SLC, UT 84106. They met Wednesday, June 27, 2017 at 7pm. Christina Derbidge, Ph.D gave the presentation on the grieving process. Unfortunately, I missed this group and hearing the advice, tips and support on this important subject. I wish I could have been there and able to share some notes.


Upcoming Events

BIAU Family & Professionals Annual Conference

Date: Friday, October 13, 2017

Time: 8am – 5pm

Place: Davis Conference Center, 1651 No. 700 W. Layton, UT 84041


Bright Ideas

                              HELPFUL WEBSITES:

http://www.caregiver.org (online webinars for caregivers)

http://www.tbicommunity.org (online educational programs)

http://www.braininjury.com (medical, legal, information resource)

http://www.abta.org (brain tumor education and information)

http://www.cdc.gov/ncipc/tbi (brain injury facts, programs, education)

http://www.ninds.nih.gov/Disorders/all-disorders (education for brain injury, stroke and other neurological disorders)

http://www.msktc.org/tbi (TBI Model Systems Knowledge Translation Center) national leaders in TBI research and patient care.

http://www.epilepsy.com/utah and/or http://www.epilepsy.com (seizure education and support by state or national)

https://biau.org (resource for those with brain injury)

http://www.brainline.org (preventing, treating and living with TBI)

Uniquely abledACTIVITIES TO DO WEBSITES:

https://store.usgs.gov/access-pass (free pass to National Parks & Federal Land Agency areas)

https://wildlife.utah.gov/watchable-wildlife-for-disabled.html (watchable wildlife for disabled persons)

http://slco.org/adaptive/plus-one-pass (Salt Lake County Disability Plus One Pass)

https://twilightinsight.wordpress.com/hobbies/hobbies-for-healing-the-brain/tbi-and-selecting-a-hobby (select a hobby – ideas especially for TBI survivors)

http://www.discovernac.org (National Ability Center)

http://wanderookie.com/blog/2015/07/27/12-beautiful-wheelchair-accessible-trails-in-utah
(wheelchair accessible trails in Utah)

https://www.visitutah.com/Media/Default/One%20Sheeters/Accessible_Utah_web.pdf (list of accessible resources)

wasatchadaptivesports.org (Wasatch Adaptive Sports)

http://www.discovernac.org (National Ability Center)

https://www.meetup.com (meet up groups)

Laptops

SHARING WEBSITES:

Laptops http://www.brainline.org/abbymaslin (blog about loving and learning after TBI)

http://www.unitingcaregivers.wordpress.com (caregivers sharing stories, tips and thoughts)

http://www.facebook.com/UTteensupportgroup (social interaction and the exchange useful resources)


Thank you for reading

Thank you for reading. I hope you found the information helpful and will follow this website via email to receive notifications of every new post. The “Follow” button is located at the beginning of the newsletter. However, if you want to subscribe only to a monthly newsletter, please email Barbara@UnitingCaregivers.com. I will add you to the newsletter email list and send you the link monthly.

If you wish to discontinue send a statement, “Unsubscribe to Newsletter” and I will remove your email address.

June 2017 Newsletter

The effects of brain injury vary and can be complex. Putting the puzzle together is easier with the help of others. For this reason I’ve gathered pieces of information on this month’s support groups and therapy services offered in the Salt Lake Valley. I also included notes from last months meeting’s in case you missed it. Check out the upcoming events and mark your calendar for the BIAU Annual Conference. Also included are links to useful websites. If you have an activity, announcements or other information you’d like to share in this newsletter, please email Barbara@UnitingCaregivers.com.


reminder

FREE SUPPORT GROUPS AVAILABLE IN THE SALT LAKE VALLEY

June 7, 2017 – Aphasia Support Group at 7:00 p.m. Meets the 1st Tuesday monthly at Brookdale, 76 South 500 East, SLC, UT. (Parking in the rear of the building.  Enter from 100 South.)

Topic: Vision Disorders and Treatment after a Stroke by Jennifer Thomas, OTR/L Occupational Therapist. For more information, please contact Christina Nessler (801) 582-1565, Extension 5379 or Kiera Berggren (801) 585-9717.

June 13, 2017– Brain Injury Alliance Support Group for Adults, 6-8 p.m. Meets every 2nd Tuesday monthly at Sanderson Community Deaf Center, 5709 South 1500 West, SLC, UT 84123. This is a social group where dinner is enjoyed together and then games played or crafts made. All caregivers and survivors are welcome. For more information call: Jennifer (801) 386-2195 or Beth (801) 585-5511.

June 15, 2017 – Caregivers and Survivors Education Group will meet separetly this month, 7-8 p.m. Meets every 3rd Thursday monthly at Intermountain Medical Center (IMC) 5171 S., Cottonwood St., Bldg. 1 Murray, UT 84107.

noone@graniteschools.orgCaregivers Meet in the conference room on the 7th Floor. Topic: A Caregiver’s Button Box, Finding Ways to Recharge, Replenish and Refresh. Start thinking of the little things that bring you joy to be able to share with each other.

Our presenter, Kerrie Neu’s husband, Laurent, is a brain injury survivor from a motorcycle accident in 1998. Kerrie will share ideas on ways to recharge and nourish ourselves. Helpful insights come from nineteen years of experience as a caregiver and a mother of two children, who were small at the time of the accident. She works for Granite School District as the Dual Immersion Specialist, coordinating and coaching teachers in Spanish Immersion, and is working on her Master’s degree in Spanish Language Pedagogy (teaching methods).

fun in sun

Survivors Meet in the conference room on the 9th Floor.  Topic: Fun in the Sun, presented by National Ability Center. Come learn what adaptive sports are available.

June 27, 2017 – University of Utah Brain Injury Support Group 7 p.m. Meets every 4th Tuesday monthly at Sugarhouse Health Center, 1138 E. Wilmington Avenue, SLC, UT 84106. Call Ryan Pello for questions at (801) 581-2221


Please Note
june-clipartFREE WEEKLY GROUPS

offered through

INTERMOUNTAIN HEALTH CARE NEURO THERAPY SERVICES

Aphasia Talking Practice Group – Meets every Tuesday Noon-1 p.m. 5770 South 250 East #G50

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­Meditation Group – Meets every Wednesday 3 p.m. 5770 South 250 East Cafeteria Conference Room

Cognitive Skills Group – Meets every Thursday Noon-1 p.m. 5770 South 250 East #G50

Contact: Dr. Russo at antonietta.russo@imail.org


Epilepsy

Epilepsy Groups for those affected by seizures.

Together we share coping strategies, provide encouragement, comfort and advice from people with common experiences. For more information contact Margo at (801)455-6089 or Utah@efa.org

June 1, 2017 – Epilepsy Group for Parents 7:00 p.m.-8:15 p.m. Meets every 1st Thursday of the month Riverton Library Auditorium 12877 S. 1830 W., Riverton, UT.

June 8, 2017 – Epilepsy Group for All Effected by Seizures 7:00 – 8:30 p.m. Meets every 2nd Thursday of the month Intermountain Medical Center (IMC) 5171 S. Cottonwood St., Bldg. 1, Ninth Floor, Murray, UT.

June 21, 2017 – Epilepsy Group for All Effected by Seizures 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Meets every 3rd Wednesday of the month SLC Main Library 200 E. 400 S., SLC, UT (2nd floor conference room).

June 22, 2017 – Epilepsy Group for Women Only 7:00 – 8:15 p.m. Meets every 4th Thursday of the month SLC Main Library 200 E. 400 S. (3rd floor conference room)

newJune 28, 2017 – Epilepsy Group for Teens 7 p.m. Will meet the 4th Wednesday monthly at the West Jordan Library, 8030 So. 1825 W., West Jordan, UT. There will be two teachers overseeing this group. Come to enjoy an activity and meet other teens with epilepsy.


Missed6
THE BRAIN INJURY ALLIANCE SUPPORT GROUP for ADULTS MEETING NOTES

Deaf CenterSanderson Community Deaf Center located 5709 South 1500 West, Murray, UT 84107

Tuesday, May 9, 2017, we had a great time at the horse races with paper money. Thank you Jennifer Gee and Beth Cardell for doing a great job directing this group. For more information call Jennifer (801) 468-0027 or Beth (801) 585-5511.


Intermountain Medical Center 5171 S, Cottonwood St., Bldg. 1, Murray, UT  84107

SURVIVORS AND CAREGIVERS EDUCATION MEETING NOTES

Matt-Head-Shot

Thursday, May 18, 2017, Matt Townsend gave an entertaining and poinent presentation on relationships.

We all want loyalty, happiness and honesty in a relationship. To feel joy and peace in a relationship we must feel:

  • Safe – including physical, financial, mental, emotional, social and spiritual safety
  • Trust – consisting of honesty and competence
  • Appreciation- hearing or seeing words of approval (remember it takes four positives to ease one negative comment)
  • Respect – showing through words and deeds
  • Validate – hearing what is said to understand without having to agree
  • Encourage – getting into the heart of your loved one and doing what you can to help them reach their goals
  • Dedication – committing to your relationship and making them feel more important than any place or thing.

Matt said trauma or health issues are the number one way to expand in these areas. We don’t grow unless we are pushed. We learn through our challenges.

For a full synopsis of what I learned from Matt and a YouTube video, see my article, The Starved Relationship, or https://unitingcaregivers.wordpress.com/2017/05/25/the-starved-relationship

Dr. Matt Townsend has many podcast, YouTube videos and sponsors The Matt Townsend show on BYUradio. Entertaining insights on improving relationships for free. He’s also founder the the Townsend Relationship Center. For more information see Matt’s Website: http://matttownsend.com/


MassageUniversity of Utah Brain Injury Support Group located at Sugarhouse Health Center 1138 E. Wilmington Avenue, SLC, UT 84106.

Wednesday, May 23, 2017 topic was on the Benefits of Massage given by Molly Sullivan, LMT. Ryan Pello organizes this meeting. If you have questions by call (801) 581-2221.


Upcoming Events

BIAU Family & Professionals Annual Conference

Date: Friday, October 13, 2017

Time: 8am – 5pm

Place: Davis Conference Center, 1651 No. 700 W. Layton, UT 84041


Bright Ideas

                              USEFUL WEBSITES:

http://www.caregiver.org (online webinars for caregivers)

http://www.tbicommunity.org (online educational programs)

http://www.braininjury.com (medical, legal, information resource)

http://www.abta.org (brain tumor education and information)

http://www.cdc.gov/ncipc/tbi (brain injury facts, programs, education)

http://www.ninds.nih.gov/Disorders/all-disorders (education for brain injury, stroke and other neurological disorders)

http://www.msktc.org/tbi (TBI Model Systems Knowledge Translation Center) national leaders in TBI research and patient care.

http://www.epilepsy.com/utah and/or http://www.epilepsy.com (seizure education and support by state or national)

https://biau.org (resource for those with brain injury)

http://www.brainline.org (preventing, treating and living with TBI)

Laptops http://www.brainline.org/abbymaslin (blog about loving and learning after TBI)

http://www.unitingcaregivers.wordpress.com (caregivers sharing Laptopsstories, tips and thoughts)

http://www.facebook.com/UTteensupportgroup (social interaction and the exchange useful resources)


Thank you for reading

Thank you for reading. I hope you found the information helpful and will follow this website via email to receive notifications of every new post. The “Follow” button is located at the beginning of the newsletter. However, if you want to subscribe only to a monthly newsletter, please email Barbara@UnitingCaregivers.com. I will add you to the newsletter email list and send you the link monthly.

If you wish to discontinue send a statement, “Unsubscribe to Newsletter” and I will remove your email address.

What Doesn’t Kill Us Makes Us Stronger, part 1

A German philosopher, Friedrich Nietzsche, actually said it more eloquently: “That which does not kill us, makes us stronger.” I thought this title was fitting for the couple I’m highlighting this week. I met Greg and Laura Nordfelt at the 2013 Brain Injury Conference, just two years after Greg’s motorcycle crash. I’ve enjoyed our friendship and watching this couple get stronger through their traumatic experience

Written by Greg Nordfelt

Greg headshotI am a three time Traumatic Brain Injury Survivor (TBI). By looking at my picture, you’ve already noticed I have a huge forehead. Many have told me I could rent space out on it as a billboard. Well it’s also a magnet to immovable objects. That’s why I’ve had three TBI’s. The first was in high school when I was skiing at Alta. I fell on a mogul run and hit the post of a sign that ironically said, “SLOW SKIING”. I hit it head on with the left side on my forehead. The second time I was racing heavy bicycles in England downhill on the wrong side of the road. I didn’t make the turn at the bottom and my front tire hit the guard rail. I hit a lamp post head first, again with the left side of my forehead. The third time I crashed my motorcycle into a bed of Lava Rocks and, again, I hit them, you guessed it, with the left side of my forehead. I am an adrenaline junky, but unfortunately my forehead had a crazy attraction to all of those immovable objects which eventually caught up to me.

Last August was our 5 year anniversary of my accident. We drove to Coeur d’Alene, this time in a car, to meet with Kootenai Health’s executives, two surgeons, and the critical care team that save my life. This was my first time to meet them consciously. I wanted to thank them individually, face to face, and hug them so they would know how grateful I am for what they did for me and my family!

Greg & Laura-Gala

2016 Greg & Laura, Festival of Trees

The press showed up and articles were written. We were on the cover of magazines. They asked us to be their “Spokespeople” for their Festival of Trees. It’s a black tie fund raising Gala.  They asked us and we agreed to help them set a donation record. They were expanding their Emergency Department and Operating Room, the two areas that saved my life. They called us the “talent”. Put us in wardrobe and makeup. They ran out of spray for my face and said I’m “Ruddy” and “Scaly”! I’ve crashed into too many immovable objects and my “talent” and “cover” days are over! We helped them set the record they asked for and raised over half a million dollars!

My primary focus after I got home from the hospital was keeping my marriage with Laura because the TBI divorce rate is huge at 70%. My second focus was keeping my family together. Everything else I had was intently driven into relearning how to speak, read, write and walk again in Neuro Rehab. I worked harder than they asked me to so I could get my job back!

Unfortunately, I lost most of my friends and communities. They became the casualties of brain injury. As a survivor, I ruminate, isolate, avoid loud noise, bright colors, confusion, strangers and crowds. I fatigue easily.

As a result, I was no longer the late night party animal I used to be. I wasn’t as apt to go on long road trips on a whim. I avoided situations where I would get over stimulated and fatigued – the exact opposite of my old self.

I woke up one day after fighting to recover and realized I was a newer version of my old self and I had lost the human connections I once had. The good news is our neuro rehab physicians and therapists not only helped me remap my brain, but gave me tools which helped me nurture my most valuable relationships. Now it was up to me to reach out to friends and family and hold fast to the human connections that were dear to me.
On my second outpatient speech therapy session I learned my biggest lesson after my accident and it had nothing to do with learning how to talk again.  It had everything to do with being taught how to nurture the most important relationship I had – my marriage! I showed up complaining about having my first disagreement with Laura since the accident.  Remember I didn’t have my wits about me yet and could barely speak, so disagreement was a huge stretch!  I sat down across the table from Kim with a huff.

Greg & Laura-landing pad.png

2016, Greg & Laura Coeur d’Alene Hospital Landing Pad

“What’s wrong?” Kim asked. I tried to explain what happened the night before with Laura. After a few minutes she said, “Greg I’ve heard enough. Where’s Laura?”

“In the car,” I said.

“You need to stand back up in your walker, walk to your car and ask her nicely to come and stand next to you.” Then say these words to Laura.  I’m sorry.  I love you.  Thank you for all you are doing every day to take care of me and then HUG her.

This was the most important thing I learned in all of my therapy, by far!  It was an awakening moment for me. I learned that day I was a traumatic brain injury survivor and others were working their butts off to take care of me.  And, I need to thank them – often.

Thank you Greg for sharing and to your therapist, Kim, who told you what caregivers need to hear often. You are an inspiration and definitely stronger by your experience!

Greg had a 35 year career with Zions Bank and was Senior Vice President before the accident. Now he is a motivational speaker and a professional member of the National Speakers Association. The year 2016 was a big year for Greg as he was the Utah Speech and Hearing Association’s (USHA) Ambassador was awarded Survivor of the Year by the Brain Injury Alliance of Utah (BAIU) in October. He is a mentor and volunteer with Neuro Rehab patients and caregivers at IMC and is writing a Memoir expected to be published in 2018.

 To see Greg’s website visit: www.gregnordfelt.com

On Wednesday, Laura’s will share her perspective.

Embracing Life Challenges

Therapy isn’t fun, but the progress and inspiration I get from other patients encourages me. Last week I met JR. He’s a recent amputee who is embracing his new life challenges. I told JR about Uniting Caregivers and asked him if he’d allow me to share his story. He graciously agreed to let me interview him.

I took a seat in the large, open sitting room just as you enter inside Rocky Mountain Care in Riverton, Utah. This area is a popular place for the in-patients to read, do crossword puzzles or chat with visitors, so we found a quiet corner by the grand piano looking towards a fireplace which wasn’t lit due to the unseasonably warm November day. The home-like atmosphere makes this place comfortable, but I have to admit, I’m glad to be here as an out-patient.

JR is sitting in a wheelchair wearing a white T-shirt with dark blue, bold letters which say, “I’m retired. Do it yourself!” I told him I look forward to wearing a T-shirt like that someday. He told me he bought it in California as a statement to his grown children. They brought their kids for him to watch every day after he retired from a newspaper printing company in 2011. “Don’t get me wrong, I love my grandchildren, but I had just retired and wanted time to do some things which I couldn’t do before retirement.”

I nodded and told him it made sense to me.

“You know you never retire from family. I wouldn’t want to,” he said as he shrugged his shoulders. “It’s just every day that made it too hard.”

I asked JR what diagnosis brought him here.

“Well, in 2001, I was diagnosed  with type 2 diabetes. It progressively got worse and by 2011, I couldn’t drive anymore because I didn’t have feeling in my feet. I couldn’t feel the gas or brake petal. I could step on a tack or staple and not feel a thing. I couldn’t feel items on the outside of my feet, but inside, my feet were very painful.”

“That sounds awful,” I said.

“Yes, and it partly led to my retirement, but the hardest part was I’ve always been an outdoor person. My feet problems made camping or driving ATV’s hard. I finally bought a Jazzie to save my feet and to use it to motorize when I’m outdoors. I also have a manual wheelchair for when I would go out to Village Inn or do other activities. I like to use that chair when I’m indoors.”

“Aren’t wheelchairs great,” I added. “My husband needs an outdoor and indoor wheelchair too.”

JR nodded in agreement.“They allow me some independence and I knew this was coming,” he said as he glanced down at his gray sock which covered his shortened leg. Later he told me the compression sock which covers the ace wrap around the newly cut leg is called a “shrinker.” It decreases swelling, which is critical for the proper fitting and use of an artificial leg.

“What happened,” I asked.

“I got an ulcer in my ankle. The open sore failed to heal even after weeks of being on a heavy duty antibiotic through an IV pic line. On week four of fighting the infection I had surgery to clean it out. Week eight they did an MRI which showed the infection had gone into the bone. On week nine my skin actually peeled when they unwrapped my leg. My toe was black. The infection had moved down into my foot and toes. That’s when the decision was made to do an amputation,” he said in a matter-of-fact way.

“I’m sorry,” I said. “I’ve heard it’s harder to heal when you have diabetes.”

“Yes it is. I fought the infection for about three months. The doctor called it gangrene and recommended amputation.”

September 1st they did the first cut on his right leg and he was scheduled for a second surgery six days later. On that sixth day he was feeling pretty good and thought he could get to the bathroom on his own. Unfortunately, he fell and broke his left hip. Instead of surgery on the amputated leg that day he had a titanium rod placed in the left femur, which was secured with two screws into the broken hip. The following day he had his second surgery on the right leg. In an eight day period of time he had three surgeries. After twenty-one days of hospitalization he was taken to the care center on a stretcher for rehab.

“The first week was torture. Not because of the amputation, but because of the broken hip. I worked hard and have done more than they’ve asked me to do. The hip has been the most painful.”

jrI first met JR on Halloween. My therapist said, “You have to meet JR, he’s a great example of embracing life challenges.” She wheeled JR into the room. I had to smile as she introduced us; he was dressed like a pirate, complete with a wooden branch for a peg leg.

I told him he looked great and we both laughed. I thought his jolly disposition along with his long white beard and hair made him also a good candidate for Santa Claus. He later told me about the trick-or-treaters who came that evening. One boy asked him what happened to his leg. His father seemed embarrassed and hurried him on to the next bag of treats. Another boy also asked what happened, but this time JR was given the time to respond.

“I was in a sword fight and lost my leg. Boy—did that boy’s eyes get wide,” JR said with a mischievous smile. “I imagine his dad had some explaining to do later,” he chuckled.

JR and I discussed how this incident reminded me of many conversations we’ve had through the years where children ask questions about Mark being in a wheelchair or why he talks the way he does. Some just bluntly ask, “What happened to you?” Or simply state, “You talk funny.”

“Some parents are so mortified they turn away and rush their child away from us. This actually makes us feel more awkward. Parents don’t need to be embarrassed. We understand Mark looks and sounds different than most,” I said.

JR agreed and added, “I’m not ashamed of my missing leg. I didn’t do anything wrong. It is what it is.”

JR shared his goals and timeline with me and said he should have his artificial leg on November 28th. He also has some work to do at home, especially modifying the shower because he won’t be able to stand to shower. He’s working on those arrangements as well as his rehabilitation.

“I want to be independent and I can be with modifications. I know there will be some limitations, but I can work around those. I came in on a stretcher, but I’ll walk out of here.” Then he added, “Hopefully before Christmas.”

Thank you, JR, for sharing your story. I really appreciate your example of embracing life challenges. Best wishes to you and your family as you make the transition home. It’s been my pleasure getting to know you and I won’t forget your example along with others at Rocky Mountain Care who have made my shoulder rehabilitation more pleasant.

There’s No Place Like Home

Nestled in the gorgeous Wasatch Mountain range is the beautiful Sundance resort. For the past several years my brother Steve has pampered us along with our parents and other siblings to a delicious dinner and outdoor theater tickets. Just a few days before Mark’s surgery in July, we found peace and entertainment surrounded by the huge pine trees as we enjoyed the Wizard of Oz. The storyline and music were perfect timing for the turmoil ahead. A few tears streamed down my face as Dorothy sang, Somewhere Over the Rainbow. The promise of blue skies, dreams coming true and troubles melting like lemon drops gave me hope for a brighter future. I’ve reflected on the story often through Mark’s recovery.

In the classic story written 77 years ago, of Dorothy and her dog, Toto, being caught in a tornado’s path which took them to the magical Land of Oz where life is strange, but beautiful. Wishing to return home, she is helped by the Good Witch of the North, but in trouble with the Wicked Witch of the West. She follows the yellow brick road to Emerald City where the great wizard lives in hopes he can take her back to a familiar way of life with the people she loves. In her travels she meets a scarecrow who wants a brain, a tin man who yearns for a heart and a cowardly lion who desperately needs courage. They all hope the Wizard of Oz will help them before the Wicked Witch of the West catches up with them. There are many twists and turns in their journey to meet the wizard who everyone says can help Dorothy return home and grant her new friends their wishes for a brain, heart and courage.

It’s common to hear in the halls of a rehab center, “I want to go home.” I’m quite sure it is the sentiment of most patients and the motivation for everyone who works hard in therapy. Some landed in rehab after surgery, while other storms such as a stroke, illness or loss of limb brought them there. All have left the comfort of their home in an effort to improve or save their health. The physical condition cyclone has taken each of them to a life that’s strange and unfamiliar. It’s made beautiful by a caring environment and other patients who understand the pain and share the goal of recovery. Wishing to return home, each is helped by good doctors, nurses, aides and therapists. The patients follow their advice like Dorothy followed the yellow brick road in hopes to get the help they need to return home. In real life there’s no Wizard of Oz who can magically get you home with all your goals achieved. Instead it takes persistent and painful work. Just as the scarecrow, tin man and lion found out, most patients learn from the journey they have within them what it takes to obtain their desire.

Dorothy was right, there’s no place like home and on Friday we were finally able to return. There is nothing more restful than sleeping in my own bed. However, I appreciate wonderful places like Rocky Mountain Care when we’re not capable or safe to be home. I’m filled with gratitude for therapists who work a bit of magic with their knowledge, and a caring staff that is all heart. I value the friendships we made there and am motivated by their life stories and courage. The environment there is very different from home, but it’s made beautiful as people improve and friendships form.

It’s hard to say goodbye to people we may never see again, who have inspired us in our lowest hours and have been with us daily in the pain and success of recovery. We return home changed by our experience and blessed by many people’s influence.

I am grateful to Steve for a wonderful annual summer tradition and for this years play which reminded me that Somewhere Over the Rainbow, skies truly are blue.