Celebrating Independence Day

July 4, 2015 2July 4, 2015We had a great night  with our daughter, Katie, and son-in-law, Eldin, at the Stadium of Fire celebrating Independence Day. We rocked it with Olivia Holt and Journey concerts and were delighted by a huge firework display. July always reminds me how fortunate and proud I am to be an American. I love reflecting on our nation’s history and the many heroes who made our country great. I wish I could feel this patriotic spirit all year long.

One of my favorite trips of all time was when we took our two kids at ages thirteen and fourteen to tour the U.S. historical sites. I wrote about it last year in an article titled Giving Thanks to a U.S. History Teacher. Here are some of my favorite excerpts:

Today I’m remembering Mr. Fox, an excellent American History teacher who taught both my children in the eighth grade. Mr. Fox had plenty of gray/white hair, which indicated he had been teaching for many years, yet did not lose his zest for teaching or history. My children described him as a creative, enthusiastic storyteller—and history is all about stories.

White House entrance

White House entrance: Chris with Grandpa, Mark, Katie and I in the background.

Our son, Christopher had Mr. Fox in 1997. He would come home from school eager to share with me what he learned in his history class. “Today Mr. Fox told us about the rooms in the White House. He said there’s no charge to take a tour of some of the rooms.” Another day he said, “Mr. Fox told us about the Smithsonian National Museums and all the cool things you can see in the Air and Space Museum,” and another day it was about the American Art or the Museum of Natural History. Every day Christopher came home excited about something he’d learned and his wish to see it.

His enthusiasm was rubbing off on me. I’d daydream about a trip to the historical sights and then wake up to the realization of the cost to fly there and the struggle of getting Mark, a wheelchair and all the extra things like a commode seat riser and other equipment we’d need to take for his care across the United States. It seemed impossible.

Additional days came where Christopher would come home with more exciting information about the historical east coast. After about a month of dreaming about these historical sites, I decided to call the airlines. They were running a special from Salt Lake City, Utah to Baltimore, Maryland with a two hour layover in Chicago. The cost of a round trip was $154.00, which was a lot less than I expected. I began to do more research on the possibility of making the trip. With Christopher’s interest about American history and knowing our daughter, Katie would have the same class the following year it was the perfect time to take the trip.

I knew it would be hard to handle without another adult to help me with Mark. It was six years after our car accident and Mark needed total assistance transferring out of his wheelchair into a bed, shower, commode and vehicle. The kids were thirteen and fourteen years old and were helpful, but since I wouldn’t have the equipment I routinely used in taking care of Mark’s needs, it was necessary to have the support of another adult. I asked my brother, Steve, and my parents if they’d be interested in making the trip with us. They all said yes and were excited to see the sites as well. I booked the flight tickets and started planning the ten day trip which was just a month away because I wanted to take the trip during the school’s Spring break.

While researching the places to visit, I was relearning a lot about American history and my excitement to see the sights calmed my fears of getting Mark there and not having certain equipment I use daily in his care.

Philadelphia carriage ride

Philadelphia carriage ride

In Baltimore, we rented a van which all seven of us fit in along with luggage and a folded up wheelchair. It was an educating trip with only a few minor problems. It was a thrill to see the Liberty Bell and take a horse and buggy tour around historical Philadelphia. Yes, we lifted Mark up in the carriage and all went on the tour. We saw Independence Hall and Congress Scan0073Hall.

Independence Hall

Independence Hall

Washington soldiers tents at Yorktown

Washington soldiers tents at Yorktown

We were in awe of the sacrifice at Valley Forge and saw the original tent which was George Washington’s. We enjoyed seeing Amish town and were amazed by the sacred spirit felt at Gettysburg. We saw where Abraham Lincoln gave the Gettysburg Address and the cemetery of some fallen soldiers from the Civil War. We toured Monticello, Thomas Jefferson’s house, and James Monroe’s home.

Two of the three ships at Jamestown

Two of the three ships at Jamestown

We loved the reenactments at Colonial Williamsburg, but many of the buildings from the 1700’s were not wheelchair accessible. We explored three recreated ships which brought 104 Englishmen in 1607 and enjoyed seeing the reconstructed settlement of Jamestown. We appreciated the Yorktown Victory Center and seeing the military encampment like those that housed Washington’s soldiers.

Mt. Vernon, George Washingtons home

Mt. Vernon, George Washingtons home

Washington Monument

Washington Monument

Utahs statue of Philo Farnsworth, T.V. inventor—born in Utah

Utahs statue of Philo Farnsworth, T.V. inventor—born in Utah

We toured George Washington’s home, and saw his and Martha’s burial sites. We felt reverence at Arlington National Cemetery and watched the changing of the guard. We saw Lincoln’s and Jefferson’s memorials and enjoyed three out of the thirteen Smithsonian Museums.

U.S. Capitol

U.S. Capitol

The flight back home left in the evening so we spent our last day admiring the beauty in our nation’s capitol building and enjoyed a tour of the White House.

Our days were packed with history and my patriotism grew each day as I realized the sacrifices and bravery of those early settlers and soldiers. It was awesome to walk in places our forefathers lived. I wasn’t just reading, I was experiencing what their lives were like and had a better understanding of what it took to start our nation.

I’m grateful to a passionate U.S. History teacher and Christopher, who motivated me beyond my fears to make this memorable trip. I appreciate my brother and parents who helped make it all possible.

Recalling this experience reminds me of those who loved their country more than self and mercy more than life. I’m indebted to them for their sacrifices. If you haven’t seen the sights and felt the strong nationalistic spirit of the early settlers and founding fathers, I highly recommend a trip like this.

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4 thoughts on “Celebrating Independence Day

  1. I went to school in DC, and then lived in northern Virginia for many years. It was so easy to see these places that I only went to some of them once. It was fun reminiscing as I read your blog today. We do have quite a history.

    • Thanks for your comment Nancy. I find it interesting we often don’t take advantage of historical sites or the beauty in the area we live in. For some reason, we feel we need to travel far from home to see amazing things.

  2. First, I’m sorry we didn’t see you at Stadium of Fire. We were there too! What an amazing night! I loved this post as I too relived the time we spent in those sacred places. I was filled with so much thankfulness as I visited historical sights of years past. There is nothing that I enjoy more than studying our history and then seeing the places in person. Fills me with so much gratitude and patriotism. I’m so glad you took the trip! Such special memories.

    • I wish we could have seen you too at the Stadium of Fire. I think you had much better seats, but it was an awesome show. I agree, visiting the historical sights does deepened the gratitude and patriotism and I’m thrilled we were able to take the trip.I hope to never forget it and the feelings I felt there.

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