Five Ways to Increase Well-being

Mind Body SoulDr. Kimberly Sieber is a Clinical Psychologist Specialist in Salt Lake City, Utah and we were honored to have her speak to our caregivers group on August 17, 2017. Having more than twenty years of experience in clinical psychology, she is an expert in helping people gain a better understanding of their own minds and well-being.

When we pay attention to our mind, we realize it never sits still. It’s all over the place. We spend a lot of time thinking about the past and why this or that happened and wishing we’d done things differently. This can lead to depression.

We also spend a lot of time planning and worrying about the future. This often leads to anxiety or panic. I appreciated the methods Dr. Sieber shared with us for improved physical and emotional well-being. I’ve felt progress in my own life the past few weeks since I started practicing her five suggested ways, which are:

1. Mindfulness and Meditation

Techniques Dr. Sieber listed:

girl practicing meditation yoga while sitting on mat clipart

  • Notice your senses (seeing, hearing, tasting, smelling and touching)
  • Take a body scan of your physical sensations—tension, pain, etc
  • What are your thoughts and/or emotions
  • Adopt a non-judgmental attitude that the emotion isn’t good or bad, just “is”
  • Accept your current experience
  • Don’t rehash the past (depression), or rehearse the future (anxiety)

Two ways to practice this:

  • Formal – breathing, body scan, imagery
  • Informal – showering, brushing teeth, eating, walking, nature

As we practice meditation, we need to accept that our mind wanders and bring it back to the thought at hand. Each day will be different and some days will be easier than others, but over time our mind will wander less and the more we do it the easier it gets. Gaining the ability to spend more time in the present will tame and control our brains.

According to Jon Kabat-Zinn, “mindfulness means paying attention in a particular way, on purpose, in the present moment, and non-judgmentally.” When we pay attention to the present, we are in the moment.

There’s more than one way to practice mindfulness, but the goal of any mindfulness technique is to achieve a state of alert, focused relaxation by deliberately paying attention to thoughts and sensations without judgment.

Dr. Sieber’s list of benefits:

Mind Full

  • Helps release depression and anxiety
  • Reduces stress and pain
  • Improves our concentration
  • Boosts creativity
  • Gives us more energy
  • Reduces stress (cortisol)
  • Reduces rumination
  • Reduces emotional reactivity (changes in brain)
  • Improves concentration and memory
  • Improves relationships
  • Improves sleep
  • Improves overall physical health (heart disease, blood pressure, pain)

2) Exercise

 Dr. Sieber’s list of benefits:

Exercises1

  • Releases brain chemicals like neurotransmitters and endorphins
  • Strengthens immune system, reducing inflammation
  • Increases body temperature which can have a calming effect
  • Reduces stress
  • Increases energy
  • Improves sleep
  • Improves self-confidence/self-esteem
  • Distraction from worries and problems

3) Nutrition

Necessary for good health and growth, Dr. Sieber shared these ideas:

Nutrition2

  • Avoid processed foods
  • Fish, meat, eggs, beans, complex carbohydrates (fruits, vegetables, whole grains)
  • Omega 3 fatty acids with EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid)
  • Vitamins and minerals (B vitamins, folic acid, vitamin D, zinc, iron)
  • Probiotics – yogurt, kombucha, sauerkraut

 

4) Healthy Thinking

How or what we think directly affects our emotions and behaviors. To improve our thoughts, Dr. Sieber listed and discussed a few ideas:

  • Identify the situation that elicited thoughts, emotions, and behaviors
  • Recognize automatic, negative patterns of thought
  • Evaluate the validity of negative thoughts
  • Explore other ways of interpreting situations
  • Avoid negative self-statements
  • Behavioral activation (just do it)

5) Gratitude

To show appreciation and return kindness to others also contributes to our well-being. Dr. Sieber’s list of benefits are:

Gratitude tree

  • Increases positive thoughts and emotions
  • Improves physical health (heart, blood pressure, immune system)
  • Improves sleep
  • Improves relationships
  • Increases self-esteem

Ways to expand our gratitude:

  • Gratitude journal
  • Write a thank you note or mentally thank someone
  • Meditate about what you are grateful for

No Giant Step

Thank you, Dr. Sieber, for this timely presentation on physical and emotional well-being. I enjoyed learning how to turn my thoughts and actions around by consciously seeking peace of mind.

Reference: Bullet points and images came from Dr. Kimberly Sieber’s slide presentation.

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September 2017 Newsletter

Welcome.OctThe effects of brain injury can be complicated and may cause feelings of isolation. Associating with others in similar circumstances can be refreshing. For this reason I’ve gathered information on this month’s support groups and therapy services offered in the Salt Lake Valley. I also included notes from last months meeting’s in case you missed it. Please check out the upcoming events and mark your calendar for the BIAU Annual Conference. Also included are links to useful websites. If you have an activity, announcements or other information you’d like to share in this newsletter, please email Barbara@UnitingCaregivers.com.


Mark your Calendar

Leaves1

FREE SUPPORT GROUPS AVAILABLE IN THE SALT LAKE VALLEY

September 5, 2017 – Aphasia Support Group at 7:00 p.m. Meets the 1st Tuesday monthly at Brookdale, 76 South 500 East, SLC, UT. (Parking in the rear of the building.  Enter from 100 South.) For more information, please contact Christina Nessler (801) 582-1565, Extension 5379 or Kiera Berggren (801) 585-9717.

September 12, 2017– Brain Injury Alliance Support Group for Adults, 6-8 p.m. Meets every 2nd Tuesday monthly at Sanderson Community Deaf Center, 5709 South 1500 West, SLC, UT 84123. This is a social group where dinner is enjoyed together and then games played or crafts made. All caregivers and survivors are welcome this month for rotisserie chicken and potatoes. Bring a side dish or dessert to share if you’d like. For more information call: Jennifer (801) 386-2195 or Beth (801) 585-5511.

September 21, 2017 –  Caregivers and Survivors Education Group Meets every 3rd Thursday monthly at Intermountain Medical Center (IMC) 5171 S., Cottonwood St., Bldg. 1 Murray, UT 84107.

Good Nights SleepCaregivers meet in the conference room on the 7th Floor.  This month’s topic: Strategies for Facilitating a Good Night’s Sleep. Presented by Neuropsychologist, Jon L. Pertab, PhD.

Journey to LiveSurvivors Meet in the conference room on the 9thFloor.  This month’s topic: Journey to Live. Presented by Trisha Beck

September 26, 2017 – University of Utah Brain Injury Support Group 7 p.m. Meets every 4th Tuesday monthly at Sugarhouse Health Center, 1138 E. Wilmington Avenue, SLC, UT 84106. Call Ryan Pello for questions at (801) 581-2221


LeavesFREE WEEKLY GROUPS

INTERMOUNTAIN HEALTH CARE NEURO THERAPY SERVICES

Aphasia Talking Practice Group – Meets every Tuesday Noon-1 p.m. 5770 South 250 East #G50

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­Meditation Group – Meets every Wednesday 3 p.m. 5770 South 250 East Cafeteria Conference Room

Cognitive Skills Group – Meets every Thursday Noon-1 p.m. 5770 South 250 East #G50

Contact: Dr. Russo at antonietta.russo@imail.org


september-month-autumn

Epilepsy Groups for those affected by seizures.

Together we share coping strategies, provide encouragement, comfort and advice from people with common experiences. For more information contact Margo at (801)455-6089 or Utah@efa.org

September 7, 2017 – Epilepsy Group for Parents 7:00 p.m.-8:15 p.m. Meets every 1st Thursday of the month Riverton Library Auditorium 12877 S. 1830 W., Riverton, UT.

September 14, 2017 – Epilepsy Group for All Effected by Seizures 7:00 – 8:30 p.m. Meets every 2nd Thursday of the month Intermountain Medical Center (IMC) 5171 S. Cottonwood St., Bldg. 1, Ninth Floor, Murray, UT.

EpilepsySeptember 20, 2017 – Epilepsy Group for All Effected by Seizures 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Meets every 3rd Wednesday of the month SLC Main Library 200 E. 400 S., SLC, UT (2nd floor conference room).

September 27, 2017 – Epilepsy Group for Teens 7 p.m. Will meet the 4th Wednesday monthly at the West Jordan Library, 8030 So. 1825 W., West Jordan, UT. There will be two teachers overseeing this group. Come to enjoy an activity and meet other teens with epilepsy.

September 28, 2017 – Epilepsy Group for Women Only 7:00 – 8:15 p.m. Meets every 4th Thursday of the month SLC Main Library 200 E. 400 S. (3rd floor conference room)


Missed It Header
THE BRAIN INJURY ALLIANCE SUPPORT GROUP for ADULTS MEETING NOTES

Deaf CenterSanderson Community Deaf Center located 5709 South 1500 West, Murray, UT 84107

Tuesday, August 8, 2017, we had a great time    playing cards and eat     Thank you Jennifer Gee and Beth Cardell for doing a great job directing this group. For more information call Jennifer (801) 468-0027 or Beth (801) 585-5511.


InCaseYouMissedItIntermountain Medical Center 5171 S, Cottonwood St., Bldg. 1, Murray, UT  84107

SURVIVORS AND CAREGIVERS EDUCATION MEETINGS were held on August 17, 2017.

Caregivers met in the conference room on the 7th Floor for a great presentation on Mind, Body and Spirit. Dr. Kimberly O. Sieber, Psychologist phD gave us five simple ways to increase physical and emotional well-being. She gave us strategies known for their medical and psychological health benefits that can easily be incorporated into the busy life of a caregiver. For details see Five Ways to Increase Your Well-being.

 

Survivors met in the conference room on the 9th Floor for an informative presentation on Vision After Brain Injury or Stroke.

 

missed it_9University of Utah Brain Injury Support Group located at Sugarhouse Health Center 1138 E. Wilmington Avenue, SLC, UT 84106. Last month they had a summer picnic at Sugar House Park on Tuesday, August 22, 2017. Sandwiches were provided while those in attendance brought food items to share.

 


Coming Soon

 

SEIZE THE NIGHT – UTAH 5K  RUN/WALK

“Come lace up your shoes, crack open your glow sticks and get ready for an electrifying 5K Run/Walk! It will be a unique and enlightening night time event, aimed at raising epilepsy awareness in Utah. Be ready to light up the dance floor as you cross the finish line.”

Date: September 16, 2017

Time: 6pm

Place: Sugar House Park, Big Field Pavilion

Registration: $25.00

Register yourself or your team today! Raise money and awareness to help people in Utah living with epilespy. Register at www.epilepsy.com/utah


Upcoming EventsBIAU FAMILY & PROFESSIONALS ANNUAL CONFERENCE

Building Connections for a Brighter Tomorrow.

Date: Friday, October 13, 2017

Time: 8am – 5pm

Place: Davis Conference Center, 1651 No. 700 W. Layton, UT 84041

Registration: $40 for members/ $50 for non members and includes lunch. Scholarships available. 

See https://biau.org/events/ for conference details and registration information.  “Attendees will learn how individuals with brain injury build connections. Topics will include: Social Skills, Rehabilitation Process, Cognitive Strategies, Technology/App use, Caregiver/Survivor Lessons, ADA, Social Security & Patient Rights, Classroom Executive Functioning, Concussion and Return to Activity/School”


dont-forget-smileyUTAH GRIZZLIES EPILEPSY AWARENESS HOCKEY GAME

Date: October 21, 2017

Time: 7 pm

Place: Maverik Center – West Valley City 

Tickets: $10 – $20

You can get your tickets at www.epilepsy.com/utah . “The attendees will be receiving epilepsy information throughout the evening, and the team will be wearing and auctioning the jerseys specially made for this game. Mark your calendar and bring your friends.”


Bright Ideas

 

                              HELPFUL WEBSITES:

http://www.caregiver.org (online webinars for caregivers)

http://www.tbicommunity.org (online educational programs)

http://www.braininjury.com (medical, legal, information resource)

http://www.abta.org (brain tumor education and information)

http://www.cdc.gov/ncipc/tbi (brain injury facts, programs, education)

http://www.ninds.nih.gov/Disorders/all-disorders (education for brain injury, stroke and other neurological disorders)

http://www.msktc.org/tbi (TBI Model Systems Knowledge Translation Center) national leaders in TBI research and patient care.

http://www.epilepsy.com/utah and/or http://www.epilepsy.com (seizure education and support by state or national)

https://biau.org (resource for those with brain injury)

http://www.brainline.org (preventing, treating and living with TBI)

Uniquely abledACTIVITIES TO DO WEBSITES:

https://store.usgs.gov/access-pass (free pass to National Parks & Federal Land Agency areas)

https://wildlife.utah.gov/watchable-wildlife-for-disabled.html (watchable wildlife for disabled persons)

http://slco.org/adaptive/plus-one-pass (Salt Lake County Disability Plus One Pass)

https://twilightinsight.wordpress.com/hobbies/hobbies-for-healing-the-brain/tbi-and-selecting-a-hobby (select a hobby – ideas especially for TBI survivors)

http://www.discovernac.org (National Ability Center)

http://wanderookie.com/blog/2015/07/27/12-beautiful-wheelchair-accessible-trails-in-utah
(wheelchair accessible trails in Utah)

https://www.visitutah.com/Media/Default/One%20Sheeters/Accessible_Utah_web.pdf (list of accessible resources)

wasatchadaptivesports.org (Wasatch Adaptive Sports)

http://www.discovernac.org (National Ability Center)

https://www.meetup.com (meet up groups)

Laptops

SHARING WEBSITES:

Laptops http://www.brainline.org/abbymaslin (blog about loving and learning after TBI)

http://www.unitingcaregivers.wordpress.com (caregivers sharing stories, tips and thoughts)

http://www.facebook.com/UTteensupportgroup (social interaction and the exchange useful resources)


newsletter

Thank you for reading. I hope you found the information helpful and will follow this website via email to receive notifications of every new post. The “Follow” button is located at the beginning of the newsletter. However, if you want to subscribe only to a monthly newsletter, please email Barbara@UnitingCaregivers.com. I will add you to the newsletter email list and send you the link monthly.

If you wish to discontinue send a statement, “Unsubscribe to Newsletter” and I will remove your email address.

 

August 2017 Newsletter

August1

The effects of brain injury can be complicated and may cause feelings of isolation. Associating with others in similar circumstances can be refreshing. For this reason I’ve gathered information on this month’s support groups and therapy services offered in the Salt Lake Valley. I also included notes from last month’s meetings in case you missed it. Please check out the upcoming events and mark your calendar for the BIAU Annual Conference. Also included are links to useful websites. If you have an activity, announcements or other information you’d like to share in this newsletter, please email Barbara@UnitingCaregivers.com.


reminder

FREE SUPPORT GROUPS AVAILABLE IN THE SALT LAKE VALLEY

August 8, 2017– Brain Injury Alliance Support Group for Adults, 6-8 p.m. Meets every 2nd Tuesday monthly at Sanderson Community Deaf Center, 5709 South 1500 West, SLC, UT 84123. This social group will enjoy pizza and root beer floats followed by card games this month. All caregivers and survivors are welcome. For more information call: Jennifer (801) 386-2195 or Beth (801) 585-5511.

August 17, 2017 – Intermountain Healthcare Brain Injury and Stroke Education Group, 7-8 p.m. Meets every 3rd Thursday monthly at Intermountain Medical Center (IMC) 5171 S., Cottonwood St., Bldg. 1 Murray, UT 84107.

Caregivers meet in the conference room on the 7thFloor.  August Caregiver Support

This months topic: Mind, Body and Spirit. Five Simple ways to increase physical and emotional well-being by Dr. Kimberly O. Sieber, Psychologist phD. We’ll be discussing a variety of strategies known for their medical and psychological health benefits and can easily be incorporated into the busy life of a caregiver.

August Survivor SG

 

Survivors meet in the conference room on the 9thFloor.

Topic: Vision After Brain Injury or Stroke.

 

fun in sun

 

August 22, 2017 – University of Utah Brain Injury Support Group 7 p.m. Meets every 4th Tuesday monthly at Sugarhouse Health Center, 1138 E. Wilmington Avenue, SLC, UT 84106. Call Ryan Pello for questions at (801) 581-2221


Please Note
FREE WEEKLY GROUPS

offered through INTERMOUNTAIN HEALTH CARE NEURO THERAPY SERVICES:

Aphasia Talking Practice Group – Meets every Tuesday Noon-1 p.m. 5770 South 250 East #G50

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­Meditation Group – Meets every Wednesday 3 p.m. 5770 South 250 East Cafeteria Conference Room

Cognitive Skills Group – Meets every Thursday Noon-1 p.m. 5770 South 250 East #G50

Contact: Dr. Russo at antonietta.russo@imail.org


Epilepsy

Epilepsy Groups for those affected by seizures.

Together we share coping strategies, provide encouragement, comfort and advice from people with common experiences. For more information contact Margo at (801)455-6089 or Utah@efa.org

August 3, 2017 – Epilepsy Group for Parents 7:00 p.m.-8:15 p.m. Meets every 1st Thursday of the month Riverton Library Auditorium 12877 S. 1830 W., Riverton, UT.

August 10, 2017 – Epilepsy Group for All Effected by Seizures 7:00 – 8:30 p.m. Meets every 2nd Thursday of the month Intermountain Medical Center (IMC) 5171 S. Cottonwood St., Bldg. 1, Ninth Floor, Murray, UT.

August 16, 2017 – Epilepsy Group for All Effected by Seizures 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Meets every 3rd Wednesday of the month SLC Main Library 200 E. 400 S., SLC, UT (2nd floor conference room).

August 24, 2017 – Epilepsy Group for Teens 7 p.m. Will meet the 4th Thursday monthly at the West Jordan Library, 8030 So. 1825 W., West Jordan, UT. There will be two teachers overseeing this group. Come to enjoy an activity and meet other teens with epilepsy.

August 24, 2017 – Epilepsy Group for Women Only 7:00 – 8:15 p.m. Meets every 4th Thursday of the month SLC Main Library 200 E. 400 S. (3rd floor conference room)


Missed8

THE BRAIN INJURY ALLIANCE SUPPORT GROUP for ADULTS MEETING NOTES

Deaf CenterSanderson Community Deaf Center located 5709 South 1500 West, Murray, UT 84107

Tuesday, July 11, 2017, a good time was had by those in attendance. Dinner was provided while others brought treats and drinks to share. Summer olympic games followed dinner. Thank you Jennifer Gee and Beth Cardell for doing a great job directing this group. For more information call Jennifer (801) 468-0027 or Beth (801) 585-5511.


 

WAS_40yrs_websiteSURVIVORS AND CAREGIVERS EDUCATION MEETING NOTES

Intermountain Medical Center 5171 S, Cottonwood St., Bldg. 1, Murray, UT  84107

Jake at Wasatch Adaptive Sports hosted our annual survivor’s and caregiver’s summer picnic, so this month we met at Snowbird Ski and Summer Resort. We enjoyed a wonderful evening in the cooler temperatures of the beautiful mountains of Little Cottonwood Canyon on Thursday, July 20, 2017. All in attendance were refreshed by the smell of pine trees and clean mountain air. We ate sandwiches and a variety of side dishes, which were brought by those in attendance. A wheelchair accessible walk and/or ride in a tram up to the top of the mountain was available for those interested. Some chose to stay and visit in the picnic area. Thanks Wasatch Adaptive Sports for a wonderful evening!

Check out their website for programs, http://wasatchadaptivesports.org

“Why Adaptive Recreation? Regular physical activity is essential for the maintenance of normal muscle strength, flexibility, and joint structure and function and may slow the functional decline often associated with disabling conditions. Adequate levels of muscular strength and endurance are associated with increased bone mass, reduction in injury from falls, and an increased ability to complete daily activities. The primary goals for increasing physical activity in individuals with disabilities are to reverse secondary effects of impaired mobility, optimize physical functioning, and enhance overall well-being.”


coming-soonUTAH PURPLE TALENT SHOW

Date: August 12, 2017

Time: Noon – 2pm

Place: Salt Lake Acting Company

Tickets: $3.00

Proceeds benefit the Epilepsy Foundation of Utah.

 

SEIZE THE NIGHT – UTAH 5K  RUN/WALK

“Come lace up your shoes, crack open your glow sticks and get ready for an electrifying 5K Run/Walk! It will be a unique and enlightening night time event, aimed at raising epilepsy awareness in Utah. Be ready to light up the dance floor as you cross the finish line.”

Date: September 16, 2017

Time: 6pm

Place: Sugar House Park, Big Field Pavilion

Registration: $25.00

Register yourself or your team today! Raise money and awareness to help people in Utah living with epilespy. Register at www.epilepsy.com/utah

 

dont-forget-smileyBIAU

 FAMILY & PROFESSIONALS ANNUAL CONFERENCE

Building Connections for a Brighter Tomorrow.

Date: Friday, October 13, 2017

Time: 8am – 5pm

Place: Davis Conference Center, 1651 No. 700 W. Layton, UT 84041

Registration: $40 for members/ $50 for non members and includes lunch. Scholarships available. 

See https://biau.org/events/ for conference details and registration information.  “Attendees will learn how individuals with brain injury build connections. Topics will include: Social Skills, Rehabilitation Process, Cognitive Strategies, Technology/App use, Caregiver/Survivor Lessons, ADA, Social Security & Patient Rights, Classroom Executive Functioning, Concussion and Return to Activity/School”

 

UTAH GRIZZLIES EPILEPSY AWARENESS HOCKEY GAME

 

Date: October 21, 2017

Time: 7 pm

Place: Maverik Center – West Valley City 

Tickets: $10 – $20

You can get your tickets at www.epilepsy.com/utah . “The attendees will be receiving epilepsy information throughout the evening, and the team will be wearing and auctioning the jerseys specially made for this game. Mark your calendar and bring your friends.”

 


Bright Ideas

                              HELPFUL WEBSITES:

http://www.caregiver.org (online webinars for caregivers)

http://www.tbicommunity.org (online educational programs)

http://www.braininjury.com (medical, legal, information resource)

http://www.abta.org (brain tumor education and information)

http://www.cdc.gov/ncipc/tbi (brain injury facts, programs, education)

http://www.ninds.nih.gov/Disorders/all-disorders (education for brain injury, stroke and other neurological disorders)

http://www.msktc.org/tbi (TBI Model Systems Knowledge Translation Center) national leaders in TBI research and patient care.

http://www.epilepsy.com/utah and/or http://www.epilepsy.com (seizure education and support by state or national)

https://biau.org (resource for those with brain injury)

http://www.brainline.org (preventing, treating and living with TBI)

Uniquely abledACTIVITIES TO DO WEBSITES:

https://store.usgs.gov/access-pass (free pass to National Parks & Federal Land Agency areas)

https://wildlife.utah.gov/watchable-wildlife-for-disabled.html (watchable wildlife for disabled persons)

http://slco.org/adaptive/plus-one-pass (Salt Lake County Disability Plus One Pass)

https://twilightinsight.wordpress.com/hobbies/hobbies-for-healing-the-brain/tbi-and-selecting-a-hobby (select a hobby – ideas especially for TBI survivors)

http://www.discovernac.org (National Ability Center)

http://wanderookie.com/blog/2015/07/27/12-beautiful-wheelchair-accessible-trails-in-utah
(wheelchair accessible trails in Utah)

https://www.visitutah.com/Media/Default/One%20Sheeters/Accessible_Utah_web.pdf (list of accessible resources)

wasatchadaptivesports.org (Wasatch Adaptive Sports)

http://www.discovernac.org (National Ability Center)

https://www.meetup.com (meet up groups)

Laptops

SHARING WEBSITES:

Laptops http://www.brainline.org/abbymaslin (blog about loving and learning after TBI)

http://www.unitingcaregivers.wordpress.com (caregivers sharing stories, tips and thoughts)

http://www.facebook.com/UTteensupportgroup (social interaction and the exchange useful resources)


 

Thank you for reading. I hope you found the information helpful and will follow this website via email to receive notifications of every new post. The “Follow” button is located at the beginning of the newsletter. However, if you want to subscribe only to a monthly newsletter, please email Barbara@UnitingCaregivers.com. I will add you to the newsletter email list and send you the link monthly.

If you wish to discontinue send a statement, “Unsubscribe to Newsletter” and I will remove your email address.

July 2017 Newsletter

July fireworksThe effects of brain injury vary and can be complex. Putting the puzzle together is easier with the help of others. For this reason I’ve gathered pieces of information on this month’s support groups and therapy services offered in the Salt Lake Valley. July starAlso included are notes from last months meeting’s in case you missed it and upcoming events to mark on your calendar. I have listed links to useful websites. If you have an activity, announcements or other information you’d like to share in this newsletter, please email Barbara@UnitingCaregivers.com.


reminder

FREE SUPPORT GROUPS AVAILABLE IN THE SALT LAKE VALLEY

July 11, 2017– Brain Injury Alliance Support Group for Adults, 6-8 p.m. Meets every 2nd Tuesday monthly at Sanderson Community Deaf Center, 5709 South 1500 West, SLC, UT 84123. This is a social group where dinner is enjoyed together and then games played or crafts made. All caregivers and survivors are welcome. For more information call: Jennifer (801) 386-2195 or Beth (801) 585-5511.

July 20, 2017 – Intermountain Healthcare Support Group meets every 3rd Thursday monthly usually at (IMC) 5171 S., Cottonwood St., Bldg. 1 Murray, UT 84107. This month the Caregivers and Survivors will combine for the annual summer picnic at 5:30-8 p.m. This year Wasatch Adaptive Sports is hosting at 9385 S. Snowbird Center Drive, Snowbird, UT 84092. There will be free tram rides and fishing! Intermountain will provide sandwiches, water, and paper goods. Please bring a side dish to share.

July ClipArt

July 27, 2017 – University of Utah Brain Injury Support Group 7 p.m. Meets every 4th Tuesday monthly at Sugarhouse Health Center, 1138 E. Wilmington Avenue, SLC, UT 84106. Call Ryan Pello for questions at (801) 581-2221


Please Note
FREE WEEKLY GROUPS

offered through

INTERMOUNTAIN HEALTH CARE NEURO THERAPY SERVICES

Aphasia Talking Practice Group – Meets every Tuesday Noon-1 p.m. 5770 South 250 East #G50

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­Meditation Group – Meets every Wednesday 3 p.m. 5770 South 250 East Cafeteria Conference Room

Cognitive Skills Group – Meets every Thursday Noon-1 p.m. 5770 South 250 East #G50

Contact: Dr. Russo at antonietta.russo@imail.org


Epilepsy

July heartEpilepsy Groups for those affected by seizures.

Together we share coping strategies, provide encouragement, comfort and advice from people with common experiences. For more information contact Margo at (801)455-6089 or Utah@efa.org

July 6, 2017 – Epilepsy Group for Parents 7:00 p.m.-8:15 p.m. Meets every 1st Thursday of the month Riverton Library Auditorium 12877 S. 1830 W., Riverton, UT.

July 13, 2017 – Epilepsy Group for All Effected by Seizures 7:00 – 8:30 p.m. Meets every 2nd Thursday of the month Intermountain Medical Center (IMC) 5171 S. Cottonwood St., Bldg. 1, Ninth Floor, Murray, UT.

July 19, 2017 – Epilepsy Group for All Effected by Seizures 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Meets every 3rd Wednesday of the month SLC Main Library 200 E. 400 S., SLC, UT (2nd floor conference room).

July balloons

July 26, 2017 – Epilepsy Group for Teens 7 p.m. Will meet the 4th Wednesday monthly at the West Jordan Library, 8030 So. 1825 W., West Jordan, UT. There will be two teachers overseeing this group. Come to enjoy an activity and meet other teens with epilepsy.

July 27, 2017 – Epilepsy Group for Women Only 7:00 – 8:15 p.m. Meets every 4th Thursday of the month SLC Main Library 200 E. 400 S. (3rd floor conference room)


Missed6

JUNE’S MEETING NOTES FOR:

THE BRAIN INJURY ALLIANCE SUPPORT GROUP for ADULTS, located at the Sanderson Community Deaf Center, 5709 South 1500 West, Murray, UT 84107. Met Tuesday, June 13, 2017, we had a luau. The Hawaiian feast was delicious as we enjoyed visiting about our individual summer plans. After dinner there were some activities available, while others choose to visit. Thank you Jennifer Gee and Beth Cardell for doing a great job directing this group. For more information call Jennifer (801) 468-0027 or Beth (801) 585-5511.



SURVIVORS AND CAREGIVERS EDUCATION, located at Intermountain Medical Center 5171 S, Cottonwood St., Bldg. 1, Murray, UT  84107.

Caregivers met in the conference room on the 7th Floor and received tips from Kerrie Neu on how to replenish, recharge and renew. She shared with us what has worked for her and other caregivers she interviewed. The presentation was helpful in igniting ideas to meet our personal needs. For more details, click on the green links.

fun in sun

Survivors met in the conference room on the 9th Floor. Thanks Greg Nordfelt for sharing your notes.

The topic was Fun in the Sun, presented by Wasatch Adaptive Sports. Jake Thelen, Program Specialist, introduced their programs and said they focus on increasing independence and mobility in a social environment. They believe in the development of ability and active living through recreation for individuals with adaptive needs and their families. Through personalized assessments and instruction, along with adaptive equipment, they work together to achieve your goals and experience the outdoors without limitations.

Wasatch has three rehab physicians, three physical therapists and up to 30 event employees and therapists to assist in events as needed.  Jake said they keep participant to therapist levels as close to one to one as possible so that survivors are protected and have an absolutely wonderful experience with their activities.

Jake said they have never had a participant not be able to perform the activity they’ve been approved to participate in! Wasatch Adaptive Sports serves approximately 800 to 1,000 survivors per year.

Wasatch have a special relationship with Snowbird and their headquarters is located at 9385 S Snowbird Center Dr, Snowbird, Utah 84092. They have access to a fishing pond at Snowbird that is one of their most popular sites. They also provide activities during each week at Jordan River Parkway, Provo, Liberty Park and Sugarhouse Park.

Jake agreed to host our combined TBI Survivor & Caregiver Support Group annual summer picnic in July and have an activity at the headquarters at Snowbird Utah (instead of a local park in Salt Lake where or annual summer picnics are usually held). This was a very gracious offer and we were all very excited to change venues this year!

For more information see Wasatch website: wasatchadaptivesports.org


University of Utah Brain Injury Support Group, located at Sugarhouse Health Center 1138 E. Wilmington Avenue, SLC, UT 84106. They met Wednesday, June 27, 2017 at 7pm. Christina Derbidge, Ph.D gave the presentation on the grieving process. Unfortunately, I missed this group and hearing the advice, tips and support on this important subject. I wish I could have been there and able to share some notes.


Upcoming Events

BIAU Family & Professionals Annual Conference

Date: Friday, October 13, 2017

Time: 8am – 5pm

Place: Davis Conference Center, 1651 No. 700 W. Layton, UT 84041


Bright Ideas

                              HELPFUL WEBSITES:

http://www.caregiver.org (online webinars for caregivers)

http://www.tbicommunity.org (online educational programs)

http://www.braininjury.com (medical, legal, information resource)

http://www.abta.org (brain tumor education and information)

http://www.cdc.gov/ncipc/tbi (brain injury facts, programs, education)

http://www.ninds.nih.gov/Disorders/all-disorders (education for brain injury, stroke and other neurological disorders)

http://www.msktc.org/tbi (TBI Model Systems Knowledge Translation Center) national leaders in TBI research and patient care.

http://www.epilepsy.com/utah and/or http://www.epilepsy.com (seizure education and support by state or national)

https://biau.org (resource for those with brain injury)

http://www.brainline.org (preventing, treating and living with TBI)

Uniquely abledACTIVITIES TO DO WEBSITES:

https://store.usgs.gov/access-pass (free pass to National Parks & Federal Land Agency areas)

https://wildlife.utah.gov/watchable-wildlife-for-disabled.html (watchable wildlife for disabled persons)

http://slco.org/adaptive/plus-one-pass (Salt Lake County Disability Plus One Pass)

https://twilightinsight.wordpress.com/hobbies/hobbies-for-healing-the-brain/tbi-and-selecting-a-hobby (select a hobby – ideas especially for TBI survivors)

http://www.discovernac.org (National Ability Center)

http://wanderookie.com/blog/2015/07/27/12-beautiful-wheelchair-accessible-trails-in-utah
(wheelchair accessible trails in Utah)

https://www.visitutah.com/Media/Default/One%20Sheeters/Accessible_Utah_web.pdf (list of accessible resources)

wasatchadaptivesports.org (Wasatch Adaptive Sports)

http://www.discovernac.org (National Ability Center)

https://www.meetup.com (meet up groups)

Laptops

SHARING WEBSITES:

Laptops http://www.brainline.org/abbymaslin (blog about loving and learning after TBI)

http://www.unitingcaregivers.wordpress.com (caregivers sharing stories, tips and thoughts)

http://www.facebook.com/UTteensupportgroup (social interaction and the exchange useful resources)


Thank you for reading

Thank you for reading. I hope you found the information helpful and will follow this website via email to receive notifications of every new post. The “Follow” button is located at the beginning of the newsletter. However, if you want to subscribe only to a monthly newsletter, please email Barbara@UnitingCaregivers.com. I will add you to the newsletter email list and send you the link monthly.

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The Recharge Button

Overwhelmed1On Tuesday, I shared part of Kerrie Neu’s address on A Caregiver’s Button Box. Taking time for ourselves to recharge helps us cope with stress and increases our ability to handle the challenges. The recharge button is whatever brings you joy, helps you feel nourished and engaged.

My favorite tips from the presentation were:

1. Exercise increases endorphins to help you stay positive and happy. It may be as simple as a walk around the block, or may need to be a workout at the gym. Going on a bicycle ride with a friend is a mini vacation for me.

2. Doing something creative brings growth and change. The enjoyment can cause us to get lost in the experience. For Father’s Day, I wrote an article Daddy’s Girl.  I started it after I got Mark into bed. I admit it was later than it should’ve been. I was so engrossed in the memories, words and looking for the right pictures that before I realized how much time had passed, I heard birds chirping and noticed the sun chasing the darkness away. It took me by surprise. I had worked on the article through the night and didn’t once notice the time. I’m not recommending, or plan on repeating such an event, but I recognized how much I relish in writing. I may need to set a timer to keep me from repeating the incident.

3. Each of our needs are different. What brings joy to one, may bring stress to another.

Shoe fit

4. When life circumstances change, we may need to modify our recharge buttons.

Change

5. For more ideas that may refresh and replenish us, Kerrie shared information she found on Twilight InsightThis is an enlightening website for anyone dealing  with traumatic brain injury. Click for instant ideas on selecting a hobby, where to go for hobbies or, a list of hobbies, and more.

6. More great websites to checkout:

Websites

Websites2

JoyThanks, Kerrie Neu, for the great pointers.

I’d like to know, what brings you joy and recharges you?

 

 

A Caregiver’s Button Box

Do you need ideas on how to replenish, recharge and renew as a caregiver? This month at our caregiver’s support group, Kerrie Neu  gave us lots of ideas. She agreed to let me share them here. With her 19 years of caregiving experience she discussed how to find joy among the challenges. Recognizing that every situation is different, these are some of the points she talked about.

noone@graniteschools.orgWritten by Kerrie Neu

“Just like my grandmother’s button box, we have to find the right button that fits the situation.  What may fit with one person may not fit another. Don’t feel guilty if you try something that other people like to do, but it just doesn’t bring you joy.  It’s okay.  I once attended a quilting class that many of my friends love.  I see their excitement and love their quilts.  However, the first month I went I stressed so much about trying to get my block ready for the next month, that I finally realized this was causing me more stress than joy.  For me, it was not the right button. Instead of acting like Cinderella’s wicked stepsisters who tried to make the glass slipper fit, we can simply find another shoe. We don’t have to fit the shoe in order to find joy and a happy ending, we can find the shoe that fits us and our situations.

escape​Let’s talk about some buttons then. First of all, Brenet Brown talks about buttons we have to be careful of. These are the easy buttons or escape buttons that we use to numb and not think about stress. Often they are self-destructive and don’t replenish us. We may think they momentarily help us forget or be happy, but in the end they usually don’t. For me, one of those escape buttons is TV binge watching. I find when I binge watch I ended up becoming cranky with my family. The TV shows themselves aren’t bad, but what I do with them does not nourish me. So I have to be careful of how often I use those easy buttons.

Neu CarsOn the flip side, Brenet Brown talks about reset buttons, or what I called recharge buttons. These are things that we can do to recharge and replenish ourselves. As caregivers these are critical in order to help us be able to continue to give to our loved ones. We talked about the lesson learned from Lightning McQueen in the movie Cars. When he chose to skip his pit stop in the race at the beginning of the movie, he suffered the consequence in the last lap when he blew two tires and ended up at the finish line with his tongue hanging out and his car in sad shape. He had to learn the lesson of working with others and taking time for maintenance. As caregivers, we must regularly take time to find joy and renew ourselves.

There are many ways to recharge. Sometimes we can do little things that only take moments like drinking a glass of water, breathing, watching wildlife, enjoying nature, watching a child, or reading a poem or inspiring quote. Other times we carve out a little more time to connect with a friend, take a walk, play a game, read a book, or create something. Periodically, it’s also good to plan for some extended time to get away and visit with family, attend a conference, or take a vacation. It’s important to find a balance in our life because we cannot give from an empty cup.  ​

Nue Bike TourOver the last 19 years, we have explored many things to see what brings us joy.  Some of our explorations were quite successful, like our bike trip to the Hiawatha Trail in Montana. Others were not so successful, like our bike tour of London.

Nue Bike Tour 1In each case, though, we learned something important and kept exploring. Never give up. Just this year we discovered that Laurent loves to listen to audio books and to do puzzles. Sometimes it takes a little thought, creativity, and extra planning to be able to do something with the one you’re giving care to, but in the end it is so worth it.

Neu Joy​Wes Stafford, former president and CEO of Compassion International said, ‘Joy is a decision, a really brave one, about how you are going to respond to life.’ Life’s hard. Choose joy anyway.”

My take away from this presentation is to be mindful of the escape, easy or numbing buttons which take me nowhere. Instead, look for the creative buttons that replenish, recharge and renew me as a caregiver. The buttons which work for me may be different from the buttons that work for you. What activities bring you joy? Writing is one of mine.

On Thursday, I will post more ideas Kerrie shared with us. You are bound to find some new buttons to try. 

To see the full presentation slides, click here.

To read more from Kerrie Neu see neusounds.com

 

 

Daddy’s Girl

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Me at age two

As a child I heard Mom say, a time or two, I had Dad wrapped around my little finger. I was the only child out of their five that he witnessed the birth because way back then fathers were not allowed in the delivery rooms at the hospital. I suspect I didn’t want him left out, so my delivery was at home.

It all started after my grandparents came to take my sister, Rosanne, home with them for an overnight stay. They did this often, taking turns with each grandchild. After they left, Mom started having strong contractions so Dad called the doctor and told him they were on their way to the hospital. Because of the pain, Mom struggled to walk to the back door towards the garage. Dad rushed ahead to drive the car out of the unattached garage closer to the back door. When he got back in the house to help her to the car he realized her water broke and the impatient and determined baby was already on its way. He ran to the phone to call the doctor again and heard the television. Realizing there was only a stairway between where they were upstairs in the kitchen and where my two brothers were downstairs in the T.V. room added concern to this already stressful situation. Dad hollered down the stairs, “No matter what, you boys do not come up these stairs!”

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Rosanne, Mick, Me & Dad

Mickey, age seven and a half and Donny nearly four, paid little attention to the hustle and bustle at the top of the stairs. Fortunately, they were more interested in the show than the arrival of a new baby, so it was easy to obey their father’s order.

By the time the doctor got to our home I had already arrived. What an entrance for a nine pound baby! I wish I could remember it… What I do remember is being referred to as their “kitchen baby”. Depending on the day, or the mood, I was amused at the thought of coming into the world in this unusual way, or completely embarrassed.

04-FamilyMurrayHomeI’ve been told Dad often teased Mom during their four pregnancies that he had delivered lots of calves on the farm, so there was no need for a doctor. I guess I was listening.

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Don, Me & Dad

I’ve always had faith in Dad’s abilities. He can usually fix anything I break and is willing to help me build whatever my mind dreams of.  I enjoy discussing ideas with him because he doesn’t tell me I can’t accomplish it, but rather points out the difficulties and then helps me find solutions to make it work out. He’s taught me to work hard for what I wanted and not to be afraid of failure. If the intended outcome didn’t occur on the first, second or third attempt, you just keep on trying and learn from your mistakes. His wisdom, experience, encouragement and optimistic attitude greatly benefit’s my life.

Dad & I Snowmobiling

1980, Dad & I

Dad and Mark

1980, Dad & Mark

Dad showed me how to have fun by providing many outdoor adventures. Horseback riding, waterskiing, snowmobiling, four-wheeling are just a few of my favorite things to do with him. He instilled in me a love for the outdoors.

Dad playing horse

Enter a caption

In addition to being adventurous and hard-working, he is generous with his time and shares everything he has. He cares about people, especially family. He loves my children and husband just as deeply as I feel he loves me.

Dad’s endured much heartbreak, but you’d never know it by his cheery nature. His mother died just a couple of weeks before his twelfth birthday and his father’s death was ten years later. Years passed and a sister was sadly murdered and he was the one who had to identify her body. He’s borne family and business disappointments without bitter feelings. He’s dealt with many health issues with no complaints. His life demonstrates how to accept the things you can’t change with calmness, while having courage to change the things he can. Without calling attention to his hardships, I recognize them and have learned a lot from the way he quietly handles his trials.

Many years have passed since my rare entrance into this world and I’m grateful for the bond it made between us. I appreciate the model he’s given me to pattern my own life and thankful for the love and support he gives me. Dad, I love you!

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2008, Mark & Dad on his 80th birthday party

Happy Father’s Day to two of my favorite men!